The Must-Have Marketing Action for 2021

Episode 145 on the Business Bites Podcast

Influencers. It’s a term we love to hate. But influencer marketing is the fastest growing marketing tool, and something all entrepreneurs need to use. 

Mae Karwowski is the founder of Obviously which is the leading global influencer agency.  Today, she takes the fear out of the word “influencer”, and breaks down why it is one of the most important tools to have in your entrepreneur toolbelt.

When you think of an influencer, your mind likely flashes a picture of the Kardashians. But, as we found out with Mae, influencers are every day people doing every day things. They’ve connected with an audience that trusts them and their suggestions. Many have a niche, whether it’s the mountain biking community, or a mom who homeschools and showcases her life, thus attracting other moms. Partnering with influencers can help you tap directly into the audience you want. 

Take time to research potential influencers that connect with your desired audience. Also, don’t count out influencers that don’t have a huge following. According to Mae, Influencers with 2,000-5,000 followers make up A LOT of the market, and can show returns just as big as Kardashian level influencers. 

Think of influencer marketing as “word of mouth…on steroids”. Who doesn’t want that?

It’s actually finding real people who have built real audiences, and they’re building careers and they’re building businesses themselves.

Mae Karwowski

Learn the truth about influencer marketing: 

  • Biggest misconception about influencers [8:53]
  • How to promote a brand authentically [13:39]
  • What’s the deal with bots? [18:06]
  • How do pitch an influencer as a brad [23:53]

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Read Episode Transcript

Rachel Brenke:
All right friends, I need you to stick with me this week. We are doing a slight pivot in the topic of marketing. Normally, I am giving y’all the exact steps of how you need to implement and do your own marketing. But, this week I am bringing somebody on who is such a brilliant individual who will be able to provide you another option, another way to get the message, and the story, and the connection of your brand out into the marketplace. As you’re going to see, I’m going to talk about right now, during pandemic it’s even more important, but it’s important any time at all.

Rachel Brenke:
I have the founder and CEO of Obviously, which is a leading global influencer. Don’t freak out, but global influencer marketing agency and technology platform. Don’t click away. I know many times when people hear the word influencer they’re like, “Ah!” No. You are going to see, and we are going to bust through the misconceptions about global influencers. Because under Mae’s leadership, since she launched this agency in 2014, this has become the global standard of influencer marketing. This is going to be a way that your brand, your business, can utilize other marketing paths to connect with consumers. It is a way to take some of the pressure off of you. And right now, that’s what we need more than anything in 2020 is to take a little bit off our plate.

Rachel Brenke:
So, I am having Mae come on to tell you guys, step by step, how to utilize influencer marketing. We have real life examples. I share about my own examples of how I am involved in this sphere of marketing. So, let’s do this, let’s jump right in.

Speaker 2:
Welcome to The Business Bites Podcast, the podcast for busy entrepreneurs. Whether you’re an online entrepreneur, or seeking after brick and mortar success, this podcast brings you quick bites of content so you can learn and grow anywhere you are. Now here’s your host, Rachel Brenke.

Rachel Brenke:
Hello friends, welcome to another week of The Business Bites Podcast. As always, I am your host Rachel Brenke. And today, I am joined with Mae who is going to talk … Is that correct? I meant to ask your name.

Mae Karwowski:
Oh yeah, it’s Mae Karwowski.

Rachel Brenke:
That’s what I thought, Mae Karwowski. Here, let me start over.

Mae Karwowski:
Cool.

Rachel Brenke:
Hey friends, welcome to another week of The Business Bites Podcast, where we get quick and busy in information to help you leverage and grow your business.

Rachel Brenke:
This week, I’m joined with Mae Karwowski to talk about using influencer marketing. Now, before y’all click away going, “Oh, it’s not for me,” I know there are some of you that are brands that are really gun shy about putting yourself front and center, but you’re also trying to figure out how to market. Well, guess what? Influencer marketing and social media is where you need to be, and Mae is going to bring all this awesome content for y’all this week.

Rachel Brenke:
So Mae, welcome.

Mae Karwowski:
Thanks so much for having me, Rachel.

Rachel Brenke:
Oh, I am thrilled. I absolutely love your topic. You know, it’s one of these things I feel like a lot of times solopreneurs get so focused in. They have to wear 500 hats, and we also have to be perfect on social media. You know, how do we even continue growing? Influencer marketing is so crucial, especially now. We’re recording this during pandemic, and so many places have either still be in lockdown, or they’re getting ready to go back into it. And what are we all doing? We’re scrolling through social media.

Mae Karwowski:
Exactly.

Rachel Brenke:
We’re looking at influencer’s stuff.

Rachel Brenke:
So before we get into the hard hitting content and information for our listeners, tell me a little bit about you and how you got into this space.

Mae Karwowski:
Yeah, definitely. So I’m the CEO and founder of Obviously. I started this influencer marketing company around seven years ago, now. We’re a team of 40. We’re based in New York, San Francisco, LA, we have an office in Paris. We work with really large brands and really cool new up-and-coming brands. From everything like Ulta and Sephora, to Google.

Mae Karwowski:
Yeah, I started the company … I was doing a lot in social media management, so I definitely know when a solo entrepreneur is like, “Hey, I don’t have time to post to Instagram or LinkedIn.” I 100% get that. It’s really, really time consuming. It used to be my full-time job. And from there I saw whoa, there are all these awesome creators who are organically building their own audiences. What if I paired those people with brands, and had them talk about brands they love and care about? It’d be a real huge positive for the influencers for growing their career, and also for the brands to really get in front of a new audience.

Rachel Brenke:
So that’s incredible, hearing about all the places where your business is, and the people that you’re working with, companies that you’re working with. How did you get to that, how did you grow? Did you come into this just naturally? Or, what was the path to getting to that point?

Mae Karwowski:
Yeah. It’s been a long road it feels like, at least. It’s been a lot of hard work, and really listening to clients needs, and really studying the market. Influencer marketing has changed so much in the past few years. I mean, honestly every six months it changes quite a bit, so there’s always a ton of research. I’m always talking to brands, finding out what they want, what they’re willing to pay for, what they’re not willing to pay for, what they’re seeing value in, what they’re not seeing value in. And then, really using that to make sure that we have the right offering for them.

Rachel Brenke:
So before we dig into the main points that we have, that are going to be great and actionable for our listeners to take away and implement now, define influencer marketing. I wasn’t going to have you do this initially, because I felt like we all have this idea of what it is. But then, you just said the key thing, it changes every six months.

Mae Karwowski:
Totally.

Rachel Brenke:
How do we even identify what that current state of influencer marketing is? How do you define it?

Mae Karwowski:
Yeah. So really broadly, an influencer is a creator on a social platform who has organically grown their audience. We work with people who are quite small, they’re nano-influencers, can have 2000, 3000 followers on the given platform, all the way up to macro-influencers, they might have over one million followers. They’ll have a talent agent, and they’ll have a whole business behind them at that point. And, we work with influencers who are really small, to those who are really big.

Mae Karwowski:
The whole industry of influencer marketing is pairing the right influencers to reach the right audiences with the right brands. And then, making sure that it’s a really smart, strategic partnership so the content that the influencer’s creating, talking about, “Hey, I love Tide detergent,” really lands correctly with their audience. It’s making sure they’re telling a story that’s authentic to them, but also hits on the key objectives of the brand at the same time, to drive a business result for the brand. It’s a hugely growing industry. I mean, it’s doubling year over year, it’s going to be a $25 billion industry by next year.

Mae Karwowski:
I think we all know the term influencer now, compared to even five years ago. People were like, “What are you talking about? What are you doing?”

Rachel Brenke:
Well, I’m glad you say that because I feel like sometimes the use of the term influencer can have almost a visceral, negative reaction.

Mae Karwowski:
Yeah.

Rachel Brenke:
Especially from those that have been in business and pounding the pavement. What are some of the biggest, and most frequent misconceptions about influencer marketing and social media? Here, I’m trying to convince my audience a little bit. They all need another avenue of marketing, and now is a fantastic time to do it. So let’s break these misconceptions for them.

Mae Karwowski:
Definitely. I think one big misconception is people immediately think of the Kardashians. And they think okay, someone who has a crazy lifestyle, lives in Los Angeles, is really glamorous, and it’s all about surface level aesthetics, and has millions and millions of followers, and lives this crazy life. Actually, most of the influencers we work with, it’s a mom who home schools her kids. Or, it’s someone who’s really into knitting. Or, it’s someone who’s really into mountain biking, and a brand wants to get in front of an audience who also really cares about mountain biking. It’s actually finding real people who have built real audiences, and they’re building careers and they’re building businesses themselves.

Mae Karwowski:
We work with a lot of influencers … I have one influencer, Mwing on Instagram, and she started, she was a graphic designer at an agency. She now is doing this full-time, she’s making an incredible business out of just documenting her own life and her two dogs. She has a partnership with Hallmark now, and her dogs are on bestselling Hallmark holiday cards.

Rachel Brenke:
Aw.

Mae Karwowski:
It’s actually a real venue, and a real way for people to support themselves and their families. It’s really cool.

Rachel Brenke:
I think that’s one of the things. Often times when you hear influencer, you automatically … At least for me, in my mind, snaps to the perfect put together blonde with her little pumpkin spice latte and her Uggs. Or, the Kardashians, or all of that. As you’re talking you’re like, “You could be a normal person.” I’m sitting here, I just jumped out of my workout to come do this interview, I’m still in sweaty workout clothes with a sweater over top because I’m shivering in my office, with a top knot. I love to know that, no matter what your story is, you could be an influencer. And as a brand, looking to authentically get in the way of consumers.

Rachel Brenke:
I think that’s one of the hard parts for many entrepreneurs is they look at influencers, and like you’re saying with Kardashians, that there’s this stigma of oh, there’s no connection, they’re untouchable. How would I want them connected to my brand? And I love that you brought that example that her dogs are on Hallmark cards, and it’s just documenting her life. I’ve talked on other episodes, everyone has a story and story is what sells, especially during pandemic for sure. I love that that’s the biggest misconception.

Rachel Brenke:
Can you think of any other misconception that may go along with it? If not, we can truck on to the next.

Mae Karwowski:
Yeah. I think another big thing is that you have to have a million followers to be an influencer. A majority of the work that we’re doing is with influencers who have between 10,000 and 50,000 followers. And then, we’re working with 100 influencers of that size, or 200, or 1000 influencers of that size. We’re not working with small brands, either. If you’re an influencer and you have 20,000 followers, you could be working with Nike, you could be working with Sephora, you could be working with Lyft. You could be working with some of the world’s biggest brands. It’s all about is your content great, do you really care about the brand? Have you been able to build an audience that truly reacts and engages with what you’re putting out there?

Mae Karwowski:
You know, I think to your example of, “Hey, I just worked out,” if you think about influencers you follow who just create really great workout content, or fitness content, or do triathlons, you’re going to pay attention when they tell you about a really cool new apparel brand, or a really cool new piece of equipment that they’ve used. You’re going to pay a lot more attention than you are on a TV commercial, or just a normal ad, because it’s someone you think hey, they actually know what they’re talking about, they’re an expert in this area.

Rachel Brenke:
I love that you said that with the triathlons because I’m a Team USA triathlon athlete, and I have worked and Nike and other brands. You hit it right on, that you don’t have to be this huge name. Even putting my businesses aside, I really think I personally attract those brands because I show up consistently, I show up and tell who I am, and so they want me to promote them.

Rachel Brenke:
This is a good segue into the next questions. How do you make the connections for these brands? Because we’ve busted through the misconception, we have micro-influencers, we have those that are showing up, putting out good content. But, how do you connect to ensure that it’s truly authentic output? I know for me, I get tons of inquiries on my athletic stuff. But, if I don’t run in those shoes, if I don’t swim in those goggles … I mean, I may test them out and do a review, but unless I absolutely love them and use them consistently, I’m not going to push that out. How do y’all do that with Obviously, to connect people so that it is authentic and not just a paid for promo?

Mae Karwowski:
Yeah, I think your example touched on a really important point which is if you don’t love the brand, and if you don’t use their products, we actively discourage you from doing any sort of partnership with that brand. Because just like what you’re doing intuitively is your audience trusts you, and if they start to see you’re promoting products you don’t actually stand behind 100%, you’re going to lose your audience over time and they’re going to tune out. People are really smart, and people know.

Rachel Brenke:
They’ll figure it out.

Mae Karwowski:
Yeah. We want people to say, “Hey, I’m doing a partnership with this brand because I think they’re awesome, and I’m so excited to work with them, because I love this product and here’s why. Here’s my story in relation to this product.” That’s what gets audiences excited, and it really needs to be genuine and authentic. And if it isn’t, it really looks pretty terrible online.

Mae Karwowski:
I think we’ve all seen really bad influencer marketing where you’re like, “Okay, that woman does not use that detox tummy tea, or that waist trainer. Give me a break.”

Rachel Brenke:
Right, right. How do you, as a brand … I’m sitting here listening to this podcast and okay, Mae has me sold, I know that I need to get in the path of my potential customers. I want to get into influencer marketing. How can the brand make sure that they’re making those authentic connections? Because obviously, you want to get your products into people’s hands so they can test it. Like I said, I’m willing to test products all the time. I just limit how I feel, limit how much I put out there. How can a brand … I guess, the way I visualize it is they’re on a fence of, “How do I decide to push out product, knowing there could be little return? And how do I make sure that I actually send it to someone that we’re going to be able to build a good relationship? Or, it’s not going to blow up in my face, that they’re just not taking it paid for.” Are there red flags? Are there things for the brand to ask, or for them to look for in an influencer?

Mae Karwowski:
Yeah. A big one that we do is we really analyze the audience of the influencer. First, it’s authenticity. Does the person actually genuinely like your product? A great thing to do is look to see have they posted about your product, or any of your competitor’s products previously. Do they have experience and expertise in your given vertical? Are they knowledgeable in your field? So when they talk will people know hey, they’re coming from a place of experience? I think that’s number one, extremely important.

Mae Karwowski:
The second thing is making sure that their audience is real, engaged, and cares about their vertical as well. We actually will break down audiences based on do you have any bots following your account? If so, how many? Where do your followers live? What’s their gender, what’s their age range? What other brands do they follow? Just really making sure that we’re getting in front of the target customer that the brand wants to be reaching.

Mae Karwowski:
You know, I think a good example of that is you might have someone who’s a bikini model and they might actually not be the best candidate if you’re a swimsuit brand. Because if they’re followed by primarily men and they were on the cover of Sports Illustrated, those guys aren’t going to be buying bikinis.

Rachel Brenke:
They need to be me. I’m not that bikini model, so I can be the one that is connecting with the other moms who would have [crosstalk 00:15:23].

Mae Karwowski:
You want to find your real audience, and your real customers.

Mae Karwowski:
And then the third part of it is you do need to test and learn. I think really working at a large enough scale so you can actually get results, and see okay, when we worked with these five influencers this really worked. When we worked with these 25 influencers, this is what worked for five of them and didn’t work for these 20. Let’s figure out was it the creative brief, was it the incentive, was it the influencers we’re working with? You need to optimize just like you would with your search engine marketing, or your Google ads, your Facebook ads. There’s a real level of tinkering and testing that needs to happen as well.

Mae Karwowski:
I think because influencer marketing is so new, that can be hard for people to hear. They’re like, “Oh no, I just want the silver bullet. I just want to find the perfect influencer right off the bat.” It’s sometimes a lot more challenging than that.

Rachel Brenke:
Well even as an influencer … It’s funny, even before this conversation, I never really considered myself one.

Mae Karwowski:
Oh yeah, you are.

Rachel Brenke:
You know, receiving products, and being on the internet and that kind of stuff … There has been times my team and I sit down, we get all of those and they go, “What do you think about these products? What do you think about this brand? Have you used them in the past?” We have a whole list of questions that we run through, that they filter through, and then they’ll send it along to me. We’ll get some really obscure things. I’ll go, “Well, I don’t think it’s going to be received well by the audience, but let me give it a shot. If I like the product, then I’ll at least commit to two or three posts, and then we’ll see where we go from there.”

Rachel Brenke:
And then, my audience fricking eats it up! So, it’s all about testing. If I just completely went on what I thought they wanted, and not actually just tested it to see, I’d probably be turning away a lot of really good opportunities. Yeah…

Mae Karwowski:
I think there’s a lot of surprises, which is really, really cool.

Rachel Brenke:
Yeah, yeah. I guess, I’m sharing this to encourage the brands out there, that may be looking at some influencers. You just gave a great framework of knowing who their audience is, who they’re reaching. And on that note, I think one of the things that I like to do when I’m also investigating a brand, or wanting to reach out to someone like you, Mae, to come on the podcast, I want to see what is their online presence like. You can look in their engagement and comments and see the type of people that engage with them.

Rachel Brenke:
You said the one thing about bots, which I find is really funny because since I have fitness related … Oh my gosh, I feel like the fitness industry is the worst for bots, especially on Instagram. Inevitably, within seconds of posting on my fitness account, it’s all these bots. I always go and try to remove them, just because I don’t want a brand to look at that and go, “Well, all she has is bot followers.” So besides just comments, how would a brand determine how many of those followers of the influencer are legit?

Mae Karwowski:
I think one important thing is that there are just bots on these social channels, and some level of bot activity is to be expected if you have a larger following. We usually say if you have over 10% of your followers look like they could be bots, that’s really a red flag. But, if you’re hovering around that 8%, 10% or lower, it’s okay because there’s a lot of garbage on the internet. The social platforms are still trying to figure it out, and are trying to really clean things up. So don’t be yourself up, I think number one. Especially if you’re not actively buying bots, and you’re not actively buying bot activity, you’re most likely okay. I think it’s great to, yeah just try to delete and block clear bot activity is a great thing to be doing, like you are doing.

Mae Karwowski:
I think the other thing is we actually really run through a whole list of criteria, just different flags that we would give an account to see if it’s a bot or not. Some of them are kind of obvious. One, do you have a profile picture? Does an account have zero or one other accounts following it? Because bots aren’t really going to have a lot of followers. Where in the world does the account originate? There are certain countries and cities that have a lot more bot activity than others. And then, do they have any engagement, have they ever posted? Have they ever posted their own photos? So just a bunch of those that we run through, and then we give a determination. It’s always approximate, but it can really give you a good sense of okay, this person, it looks like they paid for some of the activity on their account and we don’t want to work with them.

Rachel Brenke:
I think it’s funny you say that, because right before … It was a couple years ago, back when we were in the real world, pre-pandemic, I was getting ready to do some promotions with some influencers and I was going to run a marathon. I was like, “Well, let me clean out my bots.” Well, I went through Instagram because I knew there were bots, inevitably. I did exactly what you said. Look for the country that it’s in, the profile picture, but I went too fast and it ended up disabling me for the entire time that I was committed to [crosstalk 00:20:25].

Mae Karwowski:
Oh no.

Rachel Brenke:
I had to go back to my brands and just be like, “Hey, let’s just leave it and when I get unlocked and I come back …” Because you know, getting a hold of someone at Instagram was next to impossible.

Mae Karwowski:
Yeah.

Rachel Brenke:
I was like, “Then, we’ll just do a whole recap series.” That was a good pivoting way, because I was freaking out.

Rachel Brenke:
One of the questions I want to ask you is … I was freaking out, because I had contracts with these. Whether it was formalized, or they were like, “We’ll send you a pair of shoes if you post three or four times and share our hashtag.” At what level do you think that a brand should be getting into these official contracted, longterm relationships with influencers?

Mae Karwowski:
We do a lot of ambassador programs for brands, and longterm programs. I think it should always really start out, especially if you’re a micro-influencer … If you have under 75,000 followers, usually we start out with a few tests, to see if you should really be someone the brand is committing to on the longer term basis. But, contracts are in place, just to make sure that everything is super clear up front and no one is confused. Because usually, we’re conveying a lot of information. “Hey, here’s a creative brief.” If it’s a shoe company, “What size sneaker are you? What colors do you want your sneakers to be? When are you going to get them? Is this timeline for when you receive the sneakers to when we need you to post, is that reasonable and feasible for you? Can we see the content beforehand, so we can do reviews?”

Mae Karwowski:
There’s a lot of things that go into it, and it’s a lot of work on the influencer side, too. We want to make sure it’s overall 100% positive for the influencer and for the brand. It usually means writing up a bunch up front, so that everyone’s really clear and no one feels misled at all. That’s really the worst case scenario, is an influencer leaves a brand partnership feeling like, “Hey, that wasn’t that clear to me. I actually feel really uncomfortable with what happened.” We don’t want that, we want to be building really strong relationships between brands and people.

Mae Karwowski:
The space is so new, sometimes you have brands who have really unrealistic expectations, or expectations that don’t make a lot of sense for an influencer. I don’t know if this has happened to you, but we have some brands who are like, “Oh yeah, we’ll have an influencer post 10 times over the course of the year for one pair of shoes, and we’re going to want to see other content and do five rounds of edits for each piece of content.” If you’re an influencer with 10,000 followers, you didn’t know you were about to get into 25 hours of work for one pair of shoes. So we just want to make sure it’s super upfront, clear, everyone’s really happy and excited about it. And then yeah, we measure it and see if it goes well, and then we’ll keep working with that person if it goes really well. And if it doesn’t, that was great, we tried it out.

Rachel Brenke:
I want to leave them in this little last bit, because this has been really good information. What could be the tangible first step? If this brand has never stepped into influencer marketing before, what is the pitch?

Rachel Brenke:
What I visualize is what a lot of people do. You know, they reach out, offer to send me product, and either it’s a review, or a variety of posts. But like you’re saying, I’m not going to commit to 25 hours worth of work if I don’t even know if I’m going to like this product, I don’t even know if I’m going to get to use it.

Rachel Brenke:
What would be your recommendation of what a brand could pitch, as they’re trying to dip their toe into this whole influencer marketing stuff?

Mae Karwowski:
Yeah. So I think that a big thing is making sure that you’re setting up a test in influencer marketing the right way. We have a lot of brands who are like, “Oh yeah, we tried influencer marketing, it didn’t work for us.” I’ll be like, “Okay, cool. What did you guys do?” They’re like, “We worked with four influencers, and each of them had 10,000 followers, and they posted once.” I’m like, “That sample size is so, so small that we can’t tell you if it worked well or not. Let’s work with 50 influencers, or let’s work with 100. Let’s make sure they’re the right people.”

Mae Karwowski:
I think really having it be very up front, when you’re a brand. “Here’s what I want to get out of this, here’s how large of a campaign I want to do, and here are the measurable results I want to end up with.” If you can do that at the beginning, you’re going to be in such a better place. I think a lot of times brands are like, “Oh, someone DM’d me on Instagram, so I’m just going to send them a pair of shoes.” And then, they set it up in a way that’s not measurable at all, so it is really hard to then go back and say, “Did this work?” They’re like, “Okay, we saw a spike in sales.” But, you didn’t have any tracking on any of the influencers you sent shoes to, and you sent them out sporadically throughout the course of the year. It’s going to be really hard for us to tell what worked and what didn’t, we just know something happened.

Mae Karwowski:
I think really setting it up, just like you would any other marketing campaign where you’re trying to test and learn at the beginning, it’s going to be really important. And then, I think if you’re brand, brand new to influencer marketing, look at influencers who are already following your account and interacting with your account, people who are already wearing and tagging your brand online. And then, look at some of your competitors and seeing how much influencer work they’re doing, and what seems to be working or not working for them. I think that’s a great foundation to be like, “Okay, cool. Here’s our space, here’s what seems to be working well, and here’s an initial group of people that we should really start to think about, to reach out to and start conversations with.”

Rachel Brenke:
I like that, because I feel like many times in the entrepreneur business building space, whether it’s products or services … obviously, products is more relevant here. But, I either have to put myself as the business owner out there, or it’s more of let’s build affiliateships, and it’s not so much this influencer type approach. I think many people underestimate the value, and this is what I want to leave them with. They underestimate the value of just engagement, just brand awareness. Even if it is not going to directly impact sales, you’re not going to see a spike, but it’s getting that name repeatedly out into the marketplace, there is such great value to that.

Rachel Brenke:
I know for myself, I take speaking opportunities, just like you are with this, to get your brand out there in front of people. There is some elbow grease that you have to put in, and I feel like influencer marketing is a great way to give this intangible return. Of course at the end of the day, we want to see a spike, but to build the brand awareness.

Rachel Brenke:
I guess, I’m just giving y’all permission, that are listening … You know, you’re freaking out, you might be doing this virtual learning from home with kids. I am right now, and it’s a hot mess over here and I’m wanting to take stuff off my plate. I’m looking at who can I have talk about my business, who can I have that can be this influencer in their space to drive people to me. You know, my podcast does a lot of that, it is influencer marketing in a sense. I just want to encourage all of y’all to look at this, take Mae’s steps that she’s brought out here. This has been such wonderful information, please re-listen to this. As always, we’re going to have a thread in the Facebook group, talking about this.

Rachel Brenke:
I want to hear, tangibly, this week … I want to hear three tangible actions, with a deadline, of what you guys are going to do to reach out to influencer marketing. Even if you’re looking at having a local business be that influencer, maybe there’s somebody that is big in a local Chamber of Commerce, maybe they’re big in the local community, that is influencer marketing. We’re not just talking this national, international, TikTok superstar type stuff. I encourage all of y’all to dig into this. This has been wonderful.

Rachel Brenke:
If you are having any misgivings, go right back to the beginning where we talked about the frequent misconceptions. Mae did a wonderful job of debunking that. I will put all of her information in the show notes page, as always. If you guys get to the point that you’re just like, “Ugh, I know I need this but I want someone else to handle it,” I am going to have Obviously, her site, on there for you guys to check out at any time. I will talk to all of y’all next week.

Speaker 2:
Thanks for joining Rachel on this episode of The Business Bites. For show notes, a list of recommended tools, or referenced episodes, you can find them at businessbitespodcast.com. Until next time.

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Meet Mae

Mae is the Founder, and CEO of Obviously. She recognized years ago that the next phase in digital marketing would be authentic partnerships between brands and social media influencers. That vision inspired her to build Obviously from the ground up, recruiting a team of energetic, creative people along the way. Today, Obviously is a cutting-edge leader in the industry, with a client roster that includes some of the world’s most iconic brands.

Hi, I’m Rachel Brenke

Rachel Brenke

As a mom, team USA athlete and cancer-survivor, I want a real life while I have a real business.  This is why my resources don’t promote hustle-culture, rather tough-love and no-holds-barred tips to achieving both.  In addition to this website, I have a top-ranked business podcast, been featured in places like Forbes and work 1:1 with so many of you.

Enough about me though. I am proud of you for pursuing entrepreneurship. It is rewarding and amazing.  Keep at it!

Now enrolling: RealBiz Accelerator[GET INFO]
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