Business Bites Episode Epi 124 - Taking Risks in Entrepreneurship Pivots with Amanda Hedgepeth

Taking Risks in Entrepreneurship Pivots

Episode 124 on the Business Bites Podcast

The Gist Of This Episode: It’s scary to shift the focus of your business, but it’s sometimes necessary due to changes in your life or environment. Amanda Hedgepeth came on the show today to talk about the many pivots she has made and shares her best tips for taking those risks in your own businesses. 

 

What you will learn:

  • how to combat fear so you can take the steps you need
  • why you should be confident and how clients can tell when you’re not
  • how to identify what you are willing to do to take the risks you need to take
  • how multiple income streams can help you pivot in your business
  • and more!

Expand To Read Episode Transcripts

Rachel Brenke:
Hey guys, welcome to another episode of The Business Bites Podcast. I am your host Rachel Brenke. This is episode 124 and this is the perfect time in life right now for me to bring on my friend and fellow entrepreneur, Amanda Hedgepeth, because we are going to be talking about taking a risk to move your life on your terms. Unfortunately, some of you may ended up on this podcast because during the corona crisis you are having to take risks or pivot or change things due to stuff outside your control. But guess what? You still can take control, do things on your terms, and Amanda has not only done it once, but she’s doing it again. And so I’m excited, Amanda, to talk about your path in entrepreneurship and the lessons you learned and the tips that our listeners can take to be risky and pivot. So welcome.

Amanda Hedgepeth:
Oh my gosh. Thank you so much for having me. I’m so grateful. I love this topic. It’s really ironic that I’m talking about risk and pivoting because I am a total… Historically I’m a scaredy-cat and I really like to play things safe. So when I talk about being brave and pivoting and doing things, it actually kind of amazes myself and I’m like, hold on. Who am I? How did I end up being this brave girl to take risk? And how am I an entrepreneur? Like me? No, no, no. I felt safe being an employee and having somebody else run the show and I just show up and here I am today, entrepreneur 10 years later and we’ve made lots of pivots. So I’m so glad to be here and I love this subject. Thank you.

Rachel Brenke:
Of course. So let’s start with your first pivot. When you really got into entrepreneurship initially, and this is a story that’s always resonated with me, it’s always inspired me to think about moving life on my terms. So how did you guys make the decision… I guess, tell the story. You tell the story of the decisions you made and kind of how you got into making those decisions.

Amanda Hedgepeth:
So, how I became an entrepreneur was I was waiting tables at this place in Virginia Beach. It’s called Bubba’s. It is on the water, it’s beautiful, beautiful sunsets. And I was fine being a waitress because in and out, just make my money, pick up a shift if I need extra money, somebody else is the boss, whatever. Well, there was a wedding venue right beside that. And so I would wait tables, I would go to the top deck, I would look to my right and I would stare at these weddings and I was like, “I don’t know why, but I want to do with that person’s doing, the photographer.” Yep. I want that job. Yep. I have no camera. Nope, no camera. But I really want to do it. I don’t know why, but I think I can do it. I just, I don’t know where this confidence came from because it’s just historically, it’s just not how I’ve been growing up and always raised to do the safe thing, get your degree and then go do this and then go do that, work in the corporate office, whatever.

And so I got a camera and then I practiced for like nine months and I ended up being a wedding photographer the next year, 22 weddings my first year, because some fire was lit inside of me to just go, go, go, show up, work hard, mess up, learn, mess up, learn, over and over. And I’m so glad I did it. And then do you want me to tell about my next move when we move when we moved [crosstalk 00:03:38]

Rachel Brenke:
We’ll get to that in a second. I want to finish kind of the context of this story. So were you and Mike married at the time? Were the kids in play or was that still coming?

Amanda Hedgepeth:
So we were actually engaged and we were getting married that summer. So it’s hilarious because I’m looking at these weddings and I’m like, “Aw.” But I cared more about the photography. I was like, you would I’m this like starry-eyed engaged, like look at all the weddings and sometimes I would be, and I thought that was sweet, but I was like, “Wait a minute, I want that profession.” So it’s kind of ironic how I just ended up in a completely different realm than I ever thought I would. But so he got me the camera and I just worked so hard. I took horrible pictures for a year and just-

Rachel Brenke:
I think we all did.

Amanda Hedgepeth:
Right! Oh gosh. And we look back and I’m like, “What is that vignetting? Sepia? Really?” I mean I could say so many things. Everything’s crooked. I’m dizzy and nauseous looking at my pictures because everything’s so tilted. But I look back and I’m so grateful that I was a brave enough person to even post that stuff and put it up and just learn and see what people have to say and just get better and better and better. It would not have happened had I not been waiting tables staring at these people getting married. I was creeping, but I’m glad I did. I don’t regret that.

Rachel Brenke:
You guys will have to look at the show notes. Amanda is like the sweetest angelic face. So when she’s like I’m creeping, no one would even really even notice because you would just blend in and be normal. But so you and Mike were engaged and you wanted to take the steps to be a photographer. You got the camera. What did you tangibly do? I mean you just started learning and just started shooting? Because it was risky. You have the confidence but there had to have been fear. How did you combat that and learn what you needed to do to make the next steps?

Amanda Hedgepeth:
So this is 2010. So this is a decade ago. No Instagram. Facebook was the jam. So I just show… Literally ,it’s the most powerful two word sentence that I reiterate and I will not stop reiterating it, I just showed up. I show up and I show up. And I show up on Facebook on my personal page. Then December, 2010 I create a business page on there. And I don’t stop showing up literally for the next seven years and then I finally take a social media break for the first time in seven years, but for like a month or something like that. But gosh, I mean I just kept telling people, “Here’s this thing I’m doing. I’m trying to make it happen. I’d like to do it for you.”

It’s marketing 101. It’s literally just showing up and talking about what you’re doing. Whether you’re good at it or not is a whole different ball game. But I got better because I kept being willing to fail and do a bad job over and over and over because I knew if I kept failing, I would eventually get to the exact style I want and you know the exact type of clients and everything. But you can’t just get there. It is not a sprint. It’s a marathon. It takes awhile.

Rachel Brenke:
And I love how you just said that and you guys can hear the excitement in her voice. Because I actually interviewed Britney Janine last week on episode 123 and she talks in the very same way. We talked about like visual branding and how you may not be good at it, but if your excitement and your messaging and your passion peaks through, you’re going to show up and you’re going to keep talking to people and that is just so empowering to see this common trend amongst all these super successful entrepreneurs that I get to call friends now, but a lot of it is because they pivoted and moved, but they also just kept the passion and excitement into who they were and showed up each time. I love that.

Amanda Hedgepeth:
I agree. I agree. People can actually feel whether or not you’re burned out on something, whether you like it, whether you actually enjoy it, and I always said it. I mean the exclamation points, the smile on my face, the way that I spoke about my clients as if I actually really, really truly cared and I was growing with them. It was just palpable. I mean you could tell in all of my posts, even going back to the very beginning, this was a dream and it was coming true and I was grateful. I was not taking a second of it for granted. I just couldn’t help but share. It poured out of me and I’m still like that. I actually just recorded something for one of my classes and I said, “I am not burned out. I love this still.” I love it because I did it on my own time and terms and I’ve always maintained gratitude for it. Because if you lose that, people can feel it. They can tell.

Rachel Brenke:
So you started the photography business in Virginia Beach, right? When did you guys make the move down to the Outer Banks? Because that’s a big risk if you’ve already established yourself in a market.

Amanda Hedgepeth:
Oh my gosh. Especially, let’s talk about the fact that, okay, Hampton Roads, heavily populated, tons of photographers, wonderful network community, so many clients. I was really established. And I’m going to take the move to a vacation town where people don’t show up in the winter? And I mean we’re talking like Memorial Day to Labor Day slam, packed, busy. How did I make that pivot? It was a risk. It was a big risk that we took, but this was our mentality. I said, “Okay Mike, I think I can move my business an hour and a half south. Even though it’s only an hour and a half south, it is a different world, whole different world. Am I willing to work so hard in the summer and show up and shoot as much as I can in the summer and then save up really well in the winter and be mindful of the fact that I’m not going to have winter sessions like I did in Hampton Roads.”

We just decided that he was going to commute and he commuted for like two and a half years back to Virginia Beach. It was crazy. And it was really, really difficult, but we wanted to move to the Outer Banks so bad and we always… This sounds so odd to some people, but, but people who love it here are going to get it. We love this place like a person. It’s like New York City is to some people. It has a heartbeat. It has a soul. There’s something that was so deeply connected to us with the Outer Banks that it overrode our fear of taking the leap. We just were like, “Oh well. Let’s just do it.” We got married here.

And the way that we actually ended up deciding to move… It’s this tiniest, most impactful moment we’ve ever had in our life. We got home after getting groceries in Virginia Beach and there’s a orange, yellow glow on the parkway and it kind of covers up the sky. You can’t really see the stars. And there’s my freakishly articulate baby, she’s two years old. Cameron is hilarious but she was like born an old lady. So she looked up in the sky and she said, “There’s just not enough stars here. Why don’t we have stars here?” We went inside and we were like, “That’s it. We’re going. There will be stars.” And where we live now, we live on a harbor. Everyone turns the lights off at night and you can see all the stars. So we did it for so many different reasons, but that was like our big push. It was that moment and we have never regretted it since.

Rachel Brenke:
And you kind of threw it in there, tucked in the fact that Mike was commuting and it was extremely hard. And that is kind of a little bit of what I wanted to hone in on this too, that many times people look at a situation, they want to take a risk, they may feel that confidence and burning like you’re talking about, but then they’re just like, oh, I just can’t with my life circumstances. And sometimes you just can’t. But sometimes there’s going to be a couple of years you have to pay your dues. I always love the Dave Ramsey phrase, it’s in relation to debt, but, “Live like no one else so you can live like no one else.” And so for a couple years you guys lived with Mike commuting, very difficult for that to happen. And that has its own struggles, but look what the payoff has been now.

Amanda Hedgepeth:
That’s what we say. We always say, “Well, what’s the trade off?” So we live really simple. Some of our brides and grooms came to visit us in our Kitty Hawk condo and it was two bedroom, two bathroom. And we brought our third daughter home to that. It was tiny, tiny. We are so willing to live simple, to not own a lot of stuff, to not have the best car. We have always been like that and we’re actually still like that to this day. I don’t know what, it’s deeply ingrained in me. And I think it might go back to the days of riding the bus in Norfolk, no car four years, picking up coins off the ground at the Dunkin Donuts drive through and the McDonald’s drive through trying to afford shampoo. I’ve got this grit and this willing to do whatever it takes to survive and make money.

So me and Mike were like, okay, we’ll move. You’ll commute. Hopefully I can move my business down here successfully, but if not, it’s still worth it. I will wait tables. I will do what it takes. I will always have that grit. It’s ingrained in me. I think it’s from my dad. My dad used to get up at four in the morning and work and I just had that example. So I really am willing to live simple, give up things and there’s no lifestyle that we need to fulfill. Our lifestyle is do we have food on the table? Are we happy? And that’s it. And if we’ve got that, then we’re good to go. We’re kind of unconventional like that.

We’ve had friends who say they want to live down here, but they’re just not willing to give up the lifestyle that they have. So it just depends on what you value. What’s your trade off? I mean for us, our trade off, I don’t know, I probably would have given one of my arms. We just wanted to be here so bad because we just felt like it was right for us. So I’m glad it worked out for us. But I think that mentality is everything. What is your trade off? What are you willing to give up? Or how are you willing to live to get what you want?

Rachel Brenke:
If somebody is listening to this and they’re like, “Oh my gosh, I love this. I just need a little push.” I’m going to tell you what, go to rachelbrenke.com/epi124, because this is episode 124. I’m going to link all of Amanda’s stuff including her Instagram. Her stories and her feed are ones that I think about all the time when we talk about if we want to move, just pick up and go somewhere. What it is that we want? What are we willing to give up? And so I’m glad that you brought that whole message out because I think sometimes it’s too easy to sit and go, “Okay, gotta take a risk. Let’s do the money. Oh we can’t do it so we’re not going to do it.”

And you think about what can I give up? What can I trade off? But in order to stay focused in getting the goal and giving stuff up, look to other people like Amanda who have done it and how that joy and excitement… I mean you just bloomed so much when you moved from Virginia Beach to the Outer Banks. And I noticed that online. And I’ve seen you at conferences and stuff, but I consistently have seen a personal growth and… Which I do want to talk about your nonprofit here in a bit too, but I just look at the way that you took hold and the risks were there, did what needed to be done, but still have that appreciation for the risk that you took.

Amanda Hedgepeth:
Yes. Yes. Oh, I’m really proud because I’m going to tell you what, I’m a wimp. Okay. I cry all the time. I cry, I cry-

Rachel Brenke:
It is kind of true.

Amanda Hedgepeth:
Listen, Rachel will tell you. I am never planned. I cry almost almost every… Okay, not every Instagram live, but I cry because I get in my feels. I’m an Enneagram one. I moved toward Enneagram four. I start getting real wrapped up and consumed by my feelings. I’m a very passionate girl. It’s so true. But yeah. Yeah. I cannot help it. You’re right, Rachel. I am. I do, I cry. I’m sorry. I cry a lot.

Rachel Brenke:
But you know what? That, honestly, it’s not like sad crying. You can see that she’s proud of the choices that she made and it was all about the risk stuff. So let’s move on from talking about moving to Outer Banks. Let’s go into your newest pivot and risk that you’re taking, which when we scheduled this, you hadn’t even announced this yet. So do you want to share that?

Amanda Hedgepeth:
Yes. Okay. So there’s that girl on the deck waiting tables, holding that tray of soft shell crabs looking over just wanting to be that wedding photographer. I get the dream. I have the dream for nine years. We shot internationally, England, Anguilla, British Virgin Islands, all over the East coast. I have been a full time wedding photographer for so long. And last Thursday we get on Instagram live, and of course I boo hoo, but Mike and I sat together and we announced that we’re no longer shooting full wedding days. And I’m willing to still do the little two hour guys, vow renewals and all that stuff and elopements, but we’re not going to do full day weddings anymore. And that’s a hard pivot to make when that’s been such a huge part of your brand and identity.

And I think I could probably think of a few of my friends even who have stuck with it even when they know it’s time to move on out of fear. But what overrode that for us was the fact that we were in a car accident a few years ago and it was really bad and I just got so beat up and I’ve just got permanent damage. So by the end of a wedding day, I’m barely functioning. I mean I do a good job and I push through, but it’s all adrenaline. So like I get in the car and I’m just sick to my stomach and it’s so difficult.

And also because our kids are now at the age where they can actually say… Because when you were babies, this wasn’t an issue. Now they can say, “Hey, I don’t want you to go out of town for another wedding. Can you please not do that?” So we were like, “All right.” The combination of the two was enough for us to be like, “All right, it’s time to move on.” And we’ve just pivoted into so many other things that it’s okay. It’s okay to lay it down. But it’s bittersweet.

Rachel Brenke:
No, and I think it’s great because during this time you also started hosting a digital shop online called the Five Waves Shop. You also teach entrepreneurs, you have courses and stuff for photographers. Do you do other creative entrepreneurs? Is it general?

Amanda Hedgepeth:
We just launched also a business mini class literally just for people who have a thing that people come to them for and they could be getting paid and for me to walk them through the behind the scenes of my process. But yeah, we’ve got the photography mini class, a beach course, the business mini class, we’ve got the Five Wave Shop with digital downloads and an Outer Banks print shop. We do a lot of things. And Mike also has like 27 jobs. We just do so much. But we don’t feel like we’re really busy because we’re pretty good at spacing it all out. So at least, yeah… At least we’re not drowning in it.

Rachel Brenke:
Yeah. But I definitely see parallels between what you were saying earlier. Even if we moved and it didn’t work out, I didn’t get weddings, I would just wait tables in the meantime and keep trucking along with it. And same right here, it’s developing multiple income streams to help support to allow you to take a pivot. So you’ve actually gone from, in the very beginning, you didn’t have backup income streams, you just had the grit and passion to do it. And now you have evolved and actually I think it’s kind of lessened the risk over the years. Although you guys have more to risk now with having the kids, et cetera, it’s lessened the risk in it allows you to make these choices, especially when it’s one that you don’t get a choice whether or not to be physically hurt or not.

That’s something that I think a lot of listeners can’t really comprehend just because they haven’t had that in their life. And I’ll stick it on the show notes for you guys. I interviewed a couple of different people. I’ve had cancer, I interviewed Tash before when we talked about that, just chronic illness type things. What do you do? And I think it’s a very real thing that often we say taking a risk, you think, “Well it’s a risk that’s going to be my choice only to take.” You might be forced to take that risk because of an outside circumstance like health.

Amanda Hedgepeth:
Yes. Oh my gosh. Yes, I totally agree with that. There’s so much that’s out of our control. And with the car accident stuff, so we get in the car accident and I’m like, all right, I’m in the hospital and I’m like, this is how much I love shooting weddings and my brides. This is how much I love them. My friend drives three hours, brings me clothes, everything. She goes, “What can I do?” I said, “You email my brides and tell them I’m there.” She’s like, “Really? That’s what you want me to do right now.” I’m like, “Yes.” The commitment is so real. It’s so real.

But I feel like I kind of got tapped out and did what I could. I pushed through as much as I can and now I know it’s time to pivot. But gosh, these classes… And not even just creating your own stuff. Sometimes just being an affiliate for a company you like or believe in, that’s another stream of income. People don’t know how many streams of income they can have. It sounds like it’s so much work. Sometimes it’s really not. It really is easy once you get things set up. But yeah, all of that stuff has really carried us through, especially with the coronavirus, everything going on. We were so grateful to be able to pivot to online stuff because we’d already dabbled in it before and I was like, “All right, here we go. Mini class, Facebook group. Here we go. I’m teaching. Let’s do it.”

Rachel Brenke:
So how long were you thinking about quitting wedding photography before you actually did it?

Amanda Hedgepeth:
Oh, that’s a really juicy question. Because I’m like, “What will my brides think if they hear this?” So I think there was a certain wedding that I felt really bad at the end of. I think it’s been like a year, at least a full year. Maybe since last spring. I was doing everything I could to just physically be okay at this wedding, but I kept using adrenaline to get me through and so that’s not good for me because if I have too many adrenaline rushes, I get really nauseous. So I told you, I’m a wimp. I’m brave, but I’m also a wimp, a little sensitive Sally. That’s who I am and I won’t apologize. I cried and I just kind of like, by the end of the wedding, I looked at Mike and I said, “I don’t want to say it out loud.” He was like, “You don’t think we can do weddings anymore?”

I’m like, “Oh man. Thank you for saying it for me.” But he just knew that physically I’d had it, but I just, I didn’t… It was like a year ago and I didn’t… Look at me just announcing last Thursday. It was really hard for me to take that off the table because people are in my DMs and they’re like, “I really wanted you. I’m so sad. I was going to book you.” And I’m like, “I’m sorry. I feel so bad. But you can always come to the Outer Banks and I’ll do a family session with you. Thank you very much.” [crosstalk 00:21:41]

Rachel Brenke:
So let me ask you this. In that time though, I know you were struggling with the emotional decision, were there financial or other factors that went into play of why you waited so long also?

Amanda Hedgepeth:
That’s a really good question. I think yes. I will say yes. We were like, “Well how can we turn down the wedding money? How can we do that?” But the thing is when you are booking weddings and you’re really invested in the process, so your email back and forth with clients and you’re shooting their engagement session, I could also be using that time to create passive streams of income and online classes. And we just made, with our two online classes that we just launched, we just made what we used to make in over two weddings and that’s a lot of money for us.

So we were like,” Wow, okay, hold on. We could have done this sooner if I just would’ve shifted my perspective.” But here’s the thing, like with the coronavirus stuff going on, I think people are realizing… Yes, people are getting hit hard, but I think that they’re having to get creative about making money, but they’re getting forced into it. When it’s an option, like am I going to give up weddings or am I not? It’s really hard to back out and just not bite the bullet and make that decision. But, oh my gosh, with everything going on, I’m just like, “Yeah, we can totally pull off not shooting weddings.” And you just, you got to think outside the box. You got to get creative and realize that you’re going to get that time back that you would be editing or shooting engagements, whatever. You can get that time back and use it towards something where you don’t have to leave the house.

Rachel Brenke:
So how did you get into the nonprofit portion of this? I mean, you have a lot going on and I know your heart. I love your heart for giving and serving. And so I wasn’t surprised when you started it. I just have always wondered how you manage that with everything else.

Amanda Hedgepeth:
Oh my gosh. So I’ll tell you the story of how we started this nonprofit. So our nonprofit is called Homeless Looks Like. And basically I started this whole thing because my dad… My dad, who people love, he’s going to listen to this podcast. I bet he’s cry… Like, whatever minute this is on the podcast, he’s already crying. He loves me so much. He is the hardest worker I know. And everybody loves him. He’s just got this larger than life personality. He’s just so full of himself too, which is adorable. He actually, a few years ago, lost his job, his car and his home and he became homeless.

And a man who has a work ethic like that and shows up that much in his life, who becomes homeless, it’s kind of shocking. But it speaks very clearly about the fact that we do not know somebody’s story unless we ask. And to be assumptive and just say, oh they’re homeless. That’s their fault, whatever. I mean he worked so hard and he was in a very poor financial situation. He could not afford his life and he was not spending big, trust me. And so what we wanted to do was create some compassion and connection for people by telling their stories of homelessness and raising money for other nonprofits.

So we raise money for other nonprofits who take care of the homeless and we do immediate street outreach. But it’s kind of light right now cause we’re still kind of new. We’re a little over a year in. So I don’t do too much with it. I check in about three times a month and just see who we can help and who we can fundraise for. But I love it. It’s on my terms and time. It fits perfectly into my schedule. And maybe one day more of that passive income will come in and then I can give more time to the nonprofit. That’s my dream, to just really show up for it. But right now it’s in its little baby phase, but it’s doing great and it’s making an impact.

Rachel Brenke:
Well that’s exactly where I was going with this was to show the transition from the very beginning of wanting to have X, then moving on to Y and then doing what you need to do so that you can potentially move into something that’s nonprofit, something that won’t reap any financial reward for you that fulfills that intrinsic part of what you want to do with life. And I think for me, it’s really easy for me to get on the podcast and when I speak at conferences and I’m like legal this and business strategy that, but I really am first and foremost just wanting to be able to have a flexible life and live the lifestyle that I want, whatever that looks like. I don’t necessarily want to be working 500 hours per week. I love business and I would do it if I had to. I did do it in the very beginning, but yeah, that’s my goal too, is so that I can have side things, nonprofits and be able to serve in other ways that aren’t necessarily “business”, but my business has to be there to sustain it.

Amanda Hedgepeth:
Yes. And I think people are so afraid… Oh my gosh, like gosh… 15 years ago, Amanda, no way. I’m not being an entrepreneur and I’m not starting a nonprofit. No. I want to work for someone else. It’s safe. It’s easy. When you realize that it really is about spending your time wisely. I love the book Essentialism. Oh my gosh. So good about really just doing only the things you need to do to move forward. It makes so much sense. You do realize that you really are in control of your time and your schedule and I don’t have to show up nine to five to run my nonprofit. I don’t. I think people think it’s like a trade off. So you’re going to go into entrepreneurship and nonprofit organizations and you’re going to do nine to five there. That’s not true. You actually don’t need that many hours to put into it. I don’t think you do. It just depends on what you’re doing though, I guess. But…

Rachel Brenke:
I think a lot of it comes from you’re also a solid business person when it comes to being organized,, simplifying list-making and workflows and stuff. But you didn’t start there. And I think that’s also another big thing here. If someone’s listening going, “Oh my gosh, I’ll never be able to get to the point that I have passive income and a family and a nonprofit.” Well that’s because you may not necessarily right now be equipped with those tools. And Amanda Hedgepeth of 2009, 2010 wasn’t equipped with those tools. You learned those over time.

Amanda Hedgepeth:
Exactly. And not only was I not equipped, but I was 100% sure this would never be in the stars for me. It was just like, no, it’s too scary. It’s too intimidating. It’s too much. It’s too complicated. And it’s not. Even my bookkeeping, everything we do is so simplified because it’s the way my brain works. So as long as I’m doing things officially and I’m paying my taxes and doing what I’m supposed to do, really, you can simplify a lot of the process. I am all about that life, sister. Yes. Yes.

Rachel Brenke:
Love it. Love it. Well, Amanda, thank you so much for taking time. I know you guys are extremely busy with those beautiful babies of yours. They’re not so baby anymore. [crosstalk 00:28:14] Do you have one last tip? Maybe someone who’s listening who just wants to take that risk, but they’re really scared to, what could you say to help push them over the edge to just fly?

Amanda Hedgepeth:
I think the best thing that you could do is to simplify everything and just create an actual project list. Okay, what do I need to do if I want to set up my business or I want to start something, just start one list and keep it nice and simple and just go down the list one thing at a time. You do not have to do everything at once. Just like Rachel said, me 10 years ago, I wasn’t equipped with all of this. It’s been a slow build. Okay, I got my LLC, what’s next? Contracts. What’s next? This. What’s next? It is really a slow process and it’s intentional. But if you can simplify it and not try to do everything, just one project a week, a month, a day, whatever, it’s going to come to fruition. You just have to be patient and not think that you have to have it all together right out of the gate because that’s just not possible.

Rachel Brenke:
I love it. Well, thank you Amanda so much for coming on, taking time out to do this. Guys, don’t forget to head over to rachelbrenke.com/epi124. And as always we will have a thread dedicated in the Facebook community group, Business Bites, just search it on Facebook, and it will be dedicated to this episode. You can learn about risks that other entrepreneurs in our community have taken, share your story, help someone out, offer more tips, and I’ll talk to you guys next week.

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Featured Guest & Resources

Amanda Hedgepeth is an Outer Banks photographer, mom of three girls and nonprofit founder. She also hosts a digital shop online called the Five Waves Shop with lists and workflow to make motherhood and entrepreneurship easier. After spending the past almost ten years building a business and family alongside each other, she knows how important staying organizing, simplifying and list-making is to keep herself on track! She also teaches entrepreneurs how to show up bravely in the arena, own their stories and have a personal brand that stands out and connects with clients well. When she’s not creating, serving clients or hanging out with her girls… you can find her sitting in a shell bed looking for sea glass.

You can find Amanda here:
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About the author

Rachel Brenke is a lawyer, author and business consultant. She is currently helping professionals all over the world initiate, strategize and implement strategic business and marketing plans through various mediums of consulting resources and legal direction.

Hi, I’m Rachel Brenke

Rachel Brenke

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