Business Bites Episode 119: Using Quizzes for Lead Generation with Interact Co-Founder Josh Haynam

Using Quizzes for Lead Generation with Interact Co-Founder Josh Haynam

Episode 119 on the Business Bites Podcast

The Gist Of This Episode: Sometimes, it’s hard to stand out among the crowd but utilizing quizzes can help you.  Join Rachel as she talks to Josh Haynam, co-founder of Interact, as he gives you ideas on how to use quizzes in your own business.

 

What you will learn:

  • what inspired the creation of Interact
  • the different types of quizzes
  • how they can be used to funnel people to products, courses, or services you offer
  • tips on how to create your quizzes
  • and more!

Expand To Read Episode Transcripts

Rachel:
Hey Josh, thanks so much for joining me on the Business Bites podcast today. I love Interact. I love the quizzes. And I’m thrilled to have you.

Josh:
Yeah, thanks for having me Rachel. I really appreciate it.

Rachel:
Yeah, for sure. So for those of you that don’t know about Interact, it’s an online quiz building tool. You may have found me through the quizzes that I put on ads. You can also see them on the different business websites that I have. Josh is the co-founder of this company. So Josh, tell us a little bit about your entrepreneurship journey and how you ended up developing Interact.

Josh:
Yeah, definitely. It’s interesting timing, given what’s happening in the world with COVID right now and the downturn of the economy as a result because Interact had its beginnings in the last recession in 2008. I was in the middle of high school and my family ran into some financial trouble and I needed to start making money, literally to survive, to buy food and basic necessities. I went to interview at places like Burger King and Little Caesar’s Pizza and there was 40, 50 year old people there who had lost their jobs, trying to get these jobs that were paying minimum wage. I really got turned down by literally everyone, probably 50 or 60 places I tried to work. So I was kind of left with no options. I knew how to cut lawns and install sprinklers in grass and things like that because I had done it in my own back yard growing up.

So I started looking on Craigslist to find people and mostly found people who wanted to pay less than their gardener. So I started taking jobs at $10 to do a lawn that takes several hours in the hot sun in the Central Valley of California, which like 100 degrees plus. That was my first taste of being an entrepreneur because I wasn’t beholden to anybody. I could get more work if I worked harder. I just loved the interaction of connecting with people and just kind of building up a client base and creating repeat clients. From there it turned into bigger jobs, much more than just mowing lawns. We would install lawns and whole sprinkler systems and irrigation systems, all that kind of stuff. And that actually build into a fairly successful company in the middle of high school. So I was like 16, 17 years old. I would hire my friends and we would go out and do these big projects and just do week long kind of projects and all sorts of landscaping stuff. So that’s how I got started as an entrepreneur.

Then from there it was really just kind of a whirlwind of different things. I bought and sold electronics for a while, ran an agency for a while, and then Interact actually spun out of that agency because we found quizzes to be something that was really effective and so my co-founder and I basically learned how to create a tool for creating quizzes. That was our second year of college, third year. Then it’s been eight years since then. Yeah. It’s been over a decade. More than a third of my life that I have been running my own company. I have never actually had a job. And really just it was born out of necessity and now it’s kind of a passion that I have for running a business in a way that’s kind of aligned with my values and my team’s values. And it’s been a really really fun time.

Rachel:
One of the things that I love about the quizzes- Besides the fact, this whole story that it came out of hardship, you didn’t have a choice but to create entrepreneurship and you ended up here.- but I love the quizzes are so flexible. You can utilize them for a variety of industries, in a variety of capacities, ranging from lead gen to finding out what your audience members like, surveys, kind of a feedback for content creation. Out of those, what was your intention initially when you created Interact?

Josh:
Yeah. So the intention with Interact is really to connect people. The pitch that I’ve been making for almost a decade now is that what we want to do is recreate the experience that you have. The story I always tell is let’s say you walk into a coffee shop and there’s kind of a leathery, older person behind the counter who has been doing this for years and years, and that person stops you and asks you questions about what your preferences are in terms of coffee, what kind of flavors you like, when do you usually drink your coffee, how do you prepare it, all these types of things. And you are creating this really personal connection with the proprietor of the shop. After you have this conversation for a few minutes, the proprietor of the shop walks over to the shelf and pulls down an example bag of beans or maybe a couple options and says “Hey, these are the ones that I think match who you are.” Your propensity to buy at that point is crazy high.

I’ve been telling that story for 10 years now. I actually went into Brooklyn Coffee Roasting Company just on a whim. I was running in New York City and somebody did that to me. They stopped me and asked me the questions. It just validated everything that I had been saying for so long because it really did feel like a personal experience. And I ended up with coffee beans that I loved. That’s the experience that we want people to be able to offer online. As you move more and more things online, if you’re running online courses or you have workshops or you’re doing coaching or training, any of these things, the best initial experience is really to recreate something like that. Where people feel welcomed, they feel like there’s a warm presence that you’re offering them, and like you understand them. And if you’re able to ask them questions that actually apply to who they are and where they currently are in life and what kinds of things they’re already thinking about it totally changes the dynamic. You’re not selling anything anymore, you’re not pitching a product or a service, you’re simply getting to know someone and then you’re able to offer up something that’s helpful in a take it or leave it kind of way. You’re not forcing anything. So that’s kind of the broader vision behind what we are hoping to recreate through these quizzes.

Rachel:
What I love about Interact… and full disclosure guys, I use Interact obviously, and I invited Josh to come on here to help give you guys these tips and introduce this tool because I use quizzes in such a variety of ways. I have it ranging from a tax risk assessment so that my audiences in one specific business, the members can see what is their level of tax knowledge, what is their potential risks that they’re taking, all the way through something fun of what celebrity photographer are you most like or what celebrity is your personality like. It really isn’t necessarily about offering content all the time. It’s what- and exactly what you were just talking about Josh- is about delivering a unique experience. So I stand out by offering these quizzes, amongst everyone else, but with the end game of drawing people in to who I am. I’m able to inject my personality and then be able to provide them content and lay the foundation for them for sales pitches and stuff later on, so they feel a bit more comfortable. What is your favorite type of quiz or maybe the most unique one that you’ve seen done with Interact?

Josh:
Yeah. My favorite type is really the recreation of that experience. So if it is for a coffee shop it’s what coffee beans are best for you. If you have a course on Pinterest marketing then it would be what’s your marketing style or what’s your specific secret sauce in terms of your way of doing marketing. And it’s always this, what is your blank or what type of blank are you. You’re helping somebody fill out their personality profile, which really taps into why quizzes work so well for marketing, because the number one reason is that people like to learn about themselves. Self discovery is a huge thing for good reason because mental health and just overall happiness are very much tied to how well you understand and know yourself. So any quiz that helps somebody understand themselves better, particularly in the context of whatever it is you do. That’s kind of where those two things overlap really really well. So in physical products there’s a lot of stuff like what’s your skin type and then you can recommend products based on that. With digital products it’s really more about who you are as a person and then they can match up courses and workshops and that kind of thing to your personality type. And those are my favorite.

The most unique, ridiculous one that I’ve ever seen- this just popped in my head.- somebody made a quiz about which Vice President you are. But somebody had made a picture book of Vice Presidents with an octopus on their head. And I don’t know why. It just exists for whatever reason and there’s no way I would have ever heard about this other than the fact that it came through our system. It was a really widely taken quiz. Just like absolutely ridiculous and I’ll never forget it. Quizzes do have massive appeal. We did one with Red Lobster way back in the day before we really existed and I think it’s still their most liked Facebook post of all time. It had like 182,000 people like that post on Facebook. So just really really massive appeal. But everything comes back to the same concept of which type of blank are you, what type of blank are you. Where the blank is obviously filling in whatever industry you’re in. That just appeals to people. I would say 75% of the quizzes made on our platform fit that same criteria of helping people understand what personality type or what product or service matches best to who they are.

Rachel:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). What I love is when I sit down to interact, to create one, you guys already have template ones available that I can easily tweak. And I’ll think to myself, what is my end game with this quiz. And that will help determine these different types that we’re talking about here. But it’s like what is my end game and how can I also demonstrate my personality along the way. But the other key piece for us is how can we ask questions to gather additional information to kind of mine for what the audience is interested in.

I’m in a unique situation in that a lot of my subject matter, outside of this podcast, are very heavy in legal information. So a lot of it is my audience doesn’t know what they don’t know, it’s no fun. So I really have to push to put personality and kind of see what their interests are because it’s not a very interesting topic. But the quizzes allow me to frame things like personality or just asking different questions I’m able to kind of guide my own content strategy and output based on their answers. So it may not even be what the final quiz results are for them. That’s a good thing for them to take away. But the answers they’re inputting, I can be very calculated in my questions to mine information that way and they don’t even realize that we’re evaluating that data so that I know what works in advertising, what works in content output.

Josh:
Yeah. And something that’s really interesting that you can do- speaking to kind of the heavier subjects.- is two things came to mind as you were talking. One is you could do a personality type that is how risky are you as a person and that ties into legal things obviously because if you’re much more risky as a person then you probably need to be consulting lawyers more often. If you’re more safeguarded as a person in general maybe you are already doing a lot of the things that you need to make sure you’re covering in terms of legal perspective.

And then the other one that comes to mind is doing a personality quiz on who your audience is. So if you’re helping entrepreneurs with legal assistance, you can do what type of entrepreneur are you and then in the results, based on whatever personality type they are, you can recommend your products and services. But the thing that’s really unique about what type of entrepreneur are you is that in order to understand that from your perspective, you need to be asking questions like what’s your biggest strength, are you more of the logistical person or are you more of the creative, free flowing person. And that gives you some really interesting information that you can use in the way that you craft all your materials; your follow up e-mails, your marketing materials, all these things. There’s these little nuggets of information that you can pull out.

I was just listening to a workshop that Chanti Zak did with AppSumo and she was saying that she had a client who used to work for Weight Watchers and they asked this question of what’s your number one trigger food expecting the answer to be cake or pizza. And the answer for 80% of people was steak. And Chanti was saying everyone has a stake in their business. Obviously you have a stake in your business. But that kind of thing happening where there’s something that you may not know that could potentially be really really important. That’s the kind of thing you can pull out by asking quiz questions, good questions that get to know people. You can actually learn things about your audience. The more you can speak to your audience and speak to their language and speak to who they are, the more that you stop selling and you start being just a friendly voice that is here to help. And if you’re a friendly voice that’s here to help, there’s that quote if you want to get what you want, spend your life helping other people get what they want. Asking the right questions really allows you to do that.

Rachel:
And actually, in that kind of same mentality, we utilize at the law firm- So we have an intellectual property firm. We do a lot of trademark and copyright.- one of the things that we were finding out was that creatives being in our audience, a lot of online entrepreneurs, they’re quickly looking for attorneys or quickly looking for answers on whether or not they have a case. Well, we were finding a disconnect between the time we could respond, even though we’re very quick, and them going on to the next firm. So what we did with the quizzes is we allowed it to be a qualifier for them and for us. They could still input their information and kind of get this yes, you potentially have a case, no you don’t, but while you wait to hear from us, redirect to a landing page of videos and so forth. So it was nice because we were able to still be helping them there, even if we never ended up engaging them as clients.

But through the use of the quiz, multifold. It was lead gen, we’d qualify them, we got the information we needed, but then the quiz taker, the potential client was also getting… They were hooked in into getting served additional information. So they still walked away from our website instead of just a random contact form of we’ll contact you, they were… They still are. It’s still on our website. They’re served up with a page of text and video to talk a bit more about the situation they’re in and it ties them over and helps them until we can actually help them.

Josh:
Yeah, I love that. That’s a perfect example because I can imagine the number one question that a lot of people have when they come to you is do I have a case or not. And going back to that analogy of sitting behind the counter. Let’s say this was before the internet and you had a physical location and people walked in and had questions for you, the number one question they would have is do I have a case. And then you would ask them the right questions to figure out if they do or not. Your quiz is literally doing that online and you’re totally right that… Even as I’m thinking through the things that I’ve had to work on in the past where I’m just trying to get a quick answer.

If there’s an assessment or a quiz that can tell me roughly where I land and then give me resources that are specific to my particular situation, it’s so much different than having to read through a giant blog post that shows all the situations or watch a video that talks through the whole thing because now you’re getting like five minutes of video content that is specific to you versus an hour that talks about a bunch of different options and you have to weed through it and find the right thing for you. So the engagement is just dramatically higher and you’re actually able to be helpful in that way, that you would if you were there in person, which you made a great point that it’s not possible as you scale things up online. You can not be there in that way, the way that you used to be able to be if you started the way we did and you had like five people coming on a day. But then all of the sudden you have 500 people coming on a day. You can’t offer that same level of experience, but you can get close by creating something that answers the most frequently asked question.

Rachel:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah, and what I love about using Interact for it is how easy it is. Because instead of dumping everyone onto a main landing page it can filter them through and redirect based on answers. So whether I’m doing a lead generation, capturing e-mails and delivery up content that way, or I’m doing an assessment/qualifier like this, like you said, it’s not dumping them onto one big overwhelming blog post or a page with irrelevant information. It’s spoon feeding and giving them and serving them exactly what they need. Like I said, that’s one of the key things I love about Interact, is how it has all that logic. You rank it through. And I’ll put screenshots in the show notes for you guys. It’ll be at rachelbrenke.com/epi119. But you can see that you give weight to the different answers and you write up your different results and you can redirect them to different pages. It’s just so user friendly and that’s one of my biggest things for this is how there’s next to no coding. You just fill in the blank and it does it all for you.

Josh:
Yeah. We do a lot of feedback surveys and we eat our own dog food in that way of asking people for their feedback and asking good questions. Whenever we ask about the platform, the number one feedback, by a wide margin, like a huge margin, is just how easy it is to use the tool. From my perspective, being a founder and having done… At the beginning you’re doing like seven different jobs. Which it’s really interesting to see that proliferate because now that our team has grown it’s like oh, there’s literally people doing one part of what I used to do and it’s a full time job and they’re really really good at it. But then you look back and you’re like wow, I was doing nine jobs before.

Rachel:
All of them.

Josh:
Right. And so, what’s your number one issue is not having enough time. So our focus, a massive part of our focus goes into just making the tool easy to use and easy to understand and helping people be confident in the content that they’re creating. So that’s a huge aspect because this is something that’s new to most people, so ease of use is of paramount importance from our end.

Rachel:
And just from a technical standpoint, I utilize it on my WordPress. So I know that it’s copy/paste code. It pretty much can be used across the board in any website, correct? And also you have the direct link that you can just stick in on the social media.

Josh:
Yeah. It can be used on any website, embedded through an iframe, which is just really simple. But a lot of people just end up linking out directly to the direct link. So then all you have to do is add a call to action button, it goes to the quiz, and boom, you’re done.

Rachel:
Yeah. And brand, colors, all that sort of stuff if you want to even mess with that. Yeah, I hardly ever build it from scratch. I normally take one of the awesome templates you guys have and just kind of tweak it from there. So did we hit all the big points of ways you can use the quiz? Lead gen, surveying… What was the other one? Oh, assessments, the personality quiz. What else are we missing?

Josh:
I think those are the big ones. The big tie in is that it’s a recommender. It’s a way to recommend products and services. I take customer feedback really seriously. So a big part of what I do is just checking in with people and hearing their stories and their experiences. The number one thing that people are using this for is recommending products or services, whether you’re selling courses on health and wellness or on how to become an entrepreneur or do marketing or do sales or legal services, whatever it is, any of the above. It’s really about being able to be there and recommend the right thing at the right time without having to physically be there.

Rachel:
And I love that. Especially if you have an eCommerce site or you offer a lot of services. It goes back to what we were talking about earlier. It’s an overwhelm of information and you can target them down into it. That is awesome. Do you have any last tips you can think about for our audience before they go out and set up a quiz and get all of this going? I guess for me, it’s try to be as creative as you can. Get to know the audience member, like I was talking about being purposeful in the questions and the answers that they can choose from so you can get more information than just their end results. But can you think of anything additional?

Josh:
Yeah, I think it’s also on the asking questions part. There’s really a nice framework that you can think about with this. The framework is basically if I actually was trying to get to know this person, what would I ask them. And get to know them in the context of your business, obviously. But if you stay in that mindset, it becomes much easier to ask the questions. I think it gets a lot more complicated and difficult when you’re trying to strategize and get to a certain outcome or whatever it may be. But if you really just let all that go and think about if I’m imagining myself sitting behind a desk and someone walks in, what am I asking them, what are they interested in, how can I figure out what they’re interested in and offer up whatever I have as the most helpful solution to their current problems.

Rachel:
I love it. Well guys, I hope that you have enjoyed this episode. Please make sure you jump over to rachelbrenke.com/epi119. This is episode 119. I’m going to put screenshots of some of the behind the scenes, put a link out to Interact, and also a little checklist of everything we talked about here. Also jump into the Facebook group. I’m going to be posting some of the different quizzes that I use. You guys can take a look at how I do it. Feel free to pull the text, go create your own. Good luck. Please use this. This is a wonderful tool to help build your business, especially right now when everyone is stuck at home and they’re on the internet. Utilize the tools that you have and good luck.

Tool and Resources:

Behind the scenes with Interact:

Get an idea of how we built one of our own quizzes using Interact! We started with a template and customized it to fit what we needed. 

Interact Quiz Screenshot - 1
Interact Quiz Screenshot - 2
Today's episode was

sponsored by:

Eden Law - Sponsor Graphic for Shownotes
Click on image to visit Eden Law.

Featured Guest & Resources

Josh is the co-founder of interact quiz builder, a tool used by more than 100,000 small businesses for creating interactive quizzes. He started Interact at age 19 and has been an entrepreneur and founder for nearly half of his life. Over the years, Interact has worked directly with many of the world’s largest brands and tens of thousands of coaches and course creators.

Interact is a bootstrapped company, meaning that unlike most tech companies we grew through old-fashioned hard work and grit, we know what it’s like to struggle and for the first 5 years in business we barely scraped by, only in the last three years finding any kind of success.

You can find Josh here:
Website

About the author

Rachel Brenke is a lawyer, author and business consultant. She is currently helping professionals all over the world initiate, strategize and implement strategic business and marketing plans through various mediums of consulting resources and legal direction.

Hi, I’m Rachel Brenke

Rachel Brenke

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