Business Bites Episode 118: Developing a Personal Brand

Developing a Personal Brand with Woman's Day Magazine Content Editor Meaghan Murphy

Episode 118 on the Business Bites Podcast®

The Gist Of This Episode:  What do you do if you have a nine to five that you love, a career you don’t want to give up, or you simply just have to stay in working a full-time job, but you still want to have either a side hustle or develop your own personal brand or lay the foundation for a business?  Join Rachel as she talks to Meaghan Murphy from Woman’s Day magazine about tips you can use to develop your brand while working at another job.

 

What you will learn:

  • why authenticity is important
  • how to know how transparent you need to be
  • why vulnerability is a good thing
  • how to develop your brand without being the face of your brand
  • and more!

Expand To Read Episode Transcripts

Rachel Brenke:
All these episodes about entrepreneurship are great, but they really are framed primarily for those that have the full time to dedicate. So what do you do if you have a nine to five that you love, a career you don’t want to give up, or you simply just have to stay in working a full-time job, but you still want to have either a side hustle, or develop your own personal brand, or lay the foundation for a business? That is exactly what this episode is going to target in today.

I have been grateful and lucky enough to secure an awesome guest. Meaghan Murphy is the current content director of Woman’s Day magazine, which is the number one selling magazine on newsstands right now. You’re going to hear about her story where she was working at Cosmo, Self Magazine, Good Housekeeping, and you’re going to hear about all the great stuff that she’s done. She also has a podcast, she’s an author, editor, on air personality with TODAY Show, Live with Kelly and Ryan, Good Morning America, The Dr. Oz Show, all of these places. She is incredible. I found her through the interwebs and was completely attracted to the personal brand and the way and vibe that she has put herself out there, but while also having a full-time career in magazine and media. So please join me, Meaghan’s going to share her quote unquote secret sauce in tips for those of you that might be in these situations, so that you can continue on your path to entrepreneurship, whatever that looks like to you.

Speaker 2:
Welcome to the Business Bites podcast, the podcast for busy entrepreneurs, whether you’re an online entrepreneur, or seeking after brick and mortar success, this podcast brings you quick bites of content, so you can learn and grow anywhere you are. Now, here’s your host, Rachel Brenke.

Rachel Brenke:
Welcome to episode 118 of the Business Bites podcast. I am your host, Rachel Brenke. I’m excited for today’s topic, because I have a really awesome guest, but we’re also talking about one of your top questions you guys send in all the time, and how you should develop a personal brand or a side business while you’re working a corporate job, whether you have to work the corporate job, or whether you just don’t want to give it up. And so, I’m excited. Meaghan, thank you for coming on. Welcome, welcome.

Meaghan Murphy:
Yay! Thank you. Thank you for having me.

Rachel Brenke:
Of course. So right now, we’re recording this. We are in quarantine from COVID-19, and so I think this is a great time for those that may be thinking job transitions or maybe they want to start getting their personal brand built up, and I looked to you, because that was the first thing that attracted me to you when I found you through Instagram, was how you develop such your own distinct personal brand, separate from the jobs that you do. So I’m interested to know though, have you always been a big personality like that to create one or was that a strategic thing? Kind of give us some background of how you got to where you are with us.

Meaghan Murphy:
So I would say, so I’ve been in magazine, a industry professional in the media for about 25 years. So as a media professional, I make magazines and I create content. So I do instinctively know a little bit about branding and marketing, and I know what I care about and what I’m passionate about. I’ve been very lucky and very fortunate that the magazines I’ve worked at have really aligned with what I personally care about, so there’s been an easy synergy.

So one of my first jobs when I was 18 years old was at YM magazine while I was a teen, making a teen magazine. I went on to help launch Teen People magazine, again, still a teen. So my personal brand really, really aligned with my big paycheck, right? And then I went on to Cosmo, and the irony there was that was during my single years. I was in my early 20s, I was Sex in the City, and I was a Cosmo editor. So again, my stage of life really aligned very well with my career path. So it wasn’t really so hard to just kind of be being me and developing my own personal brand, if you will, or for me, just my own personality in life, because my jobs aligned.

Then I moved on to Self magazine, and I always say that was my self-formative years. That’s when I got engaged, and I got married, and I had a kid, and then I had another kid, and then I had another kid. I became a fitness professional. I was a fitness director and the deputy editor there, I’ve been a certified trainer for 17 years. Those were the things I cared about in those moments, and so again, who I was really aligned very seamlessly with the job I was doing. Fast forward, then I went on to Good Housekeeping, and no small coincidence that that was the same moment when I moved from Jersey City to the suburbs, and I got a fence and a yard, and a swing set, and my first home, when I was at Good Housekeeping.

So again, I’m developing my so-called personal brand. I don’t even always love to call it that, while doing a job I love, and I’ve just moved on over to Woman’s Day as the content director of this magazine, and I’m really excited about that because my job here is to energize it, and to sort of make it a destination for celebration, which is really where I’m at in my life right now, as my kids are nine, eight, and six, and I have a new book coming out and all kinds of excitement going around. But I think the lesson here is that when you love something, it doesn’t feel like work, right? And if you’re true to your passions and true to your belief, and really chase what excites you versus a paycheck, all of the marketing, and the branding, and the authenticity sort of just flows forward naturally.

So while I have been able to build things like The Yay List! and I have a new book coming out called The Fully Charged Life, and I began to be a bit of a life hacker and lifestyle expert in the mom space, these were just an extension of things I believed in, cared about, and was doing in my own life already. So I think that from that perspective, I always hate to say be authentic, or to build your brand, but really, it’s just figure out what you care about and chase that, do that, because the more you care about whatever it is you’re doing, selling, promoting, the more likely other people are going to want it too.

Rachel Brenke:
Well, and that’s what I was going to ask in this, is do you believe that this quote unquote personal brand, and by the way, I’m using that term because that’s so common now.

Meaghan Murphy:
Sure. 100%.

Rachel Brenke:
[inaudible 00:07:00] doing this, nobody even understood really what that… The terminology wasn’t coined at the time, but I was going to ask is, do you feel that the developing of that quote unquote personal brand directly led to the success and trajectory of your career positions?

Meaghan Murphy:
Sure, yeah. I care a whole lot. I always say sometimes I feel like a Lorax, I just care a whole lot and the more I care, the better work I do. I mean, I couldn’t be working at Cosmo right now. I don’t want to give sex position advice to 20 somethings, you know what I mean? I wouldn’t really be… Rest in peace, that good at YM or Teen People right now, because I don’t care so much about NSYNC or whoever big boy band is hot right now.

Rachel Brenke:
The fact you said NSYNC shows that you have no [inaudible 00:07:47].

Meaghan Murphy:
Exactly, no concept. I mean, I know the Savage dance is really big on TikTok right now, and that’s about the extent of my cool teen knowledge, because my kids are still… My daughter’s nine, I know whatever a nine year old knows. But yeah, I think that’s the thing, I’ve had career success and I’ve been able to do good things, really because I know what I care about, and I think that’s what’s so important for everyone, especially now as we’re sort of, we’re home and maybe feeling a little stuck. What do you care about? What do your friends come to you for and ask advice about? What would be the three key characteristics you use to describe yourself? And that’s where the secret sauce is, that’s where the magic is, is knowing what matters to you so that you can say yes to those things, and really own and care about those things.

Rachel Brenke:
And you know what’s interesting, is I was drawn to you for your energy, and I mean, I knew you kind of through a mutual friend, but then it was the energy that kept me there, and at the time of my life when I found you, I was craving that sort of energy.

Meaghan Murphy:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Rachel Brenke:
So even as you’re talking, it doesn’t necessarily even have to be a topical thing, it could be energy, it could be the vibe that you’re putting out.

Meaghan Murphy:
100%.

Rachel Brenke:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Meaghan Murphy:
Well, and I will say this, so I think our mutual friend is Dorothy, who’s an incredible human, and we sort of found each other, and [inaudible 00:09:16] so I also think there’s this weird thing of making your mess your message. I lost my father to pancreatic cancer and it was really, really hard, and fast and furious, and down and dirty, and awful, and in getting through that, I started something called Operation Good Grief, and it was really just an exercise for me, a selfish exercise to find something that didn’t suck every day, and document it. And so, I would take a picture of daffodils at the end of my walk, or a really beautiful sunset, or foam on a latte, a rainbow, a drawing that my kids made, and I would post it on Instagram with that hashtag, operationgoodgrief.

It was an exercise to help me to find positives, to find reasons for being. I had three kids who depended on me and I was really down in the dumps, and it was a very dark, hard period of my life. My dad was my guy, never thought I would lose him that way, and so soon, he was 66 years old. And by putting myself out there and by starting this exercise for me, I connected with so many people like Dorothy, who was also going through loss who said, “Hey, you know what? This is working for me too.” And that was an exercise that I kept up for two or three years before it really started to click with me, and I began to retrain my brain to see the positive more easily. Well, that was an exercise of self-help, right? I didn’t know that that would lead to a book deal and a standalone Instagram, et cetera.

So the message there is that when you pursue what matters to you, and you pursue self-care, and being the happiest, healthiest version of you, good things happen, and surprising things happen in surprising ways. So my book is called The Fully Charged Life, and it is a radically simple guide to having endless energy and finding the yay in every day, and that was really born from me working through my shit publicly, right? And all of the lessons I’ve learned along the years as a magazine editor, interviewing different experts, meeting different people and all of that, right? I didn’t set out to write The Fully Charged Life 10 years ago, it wasn’t like, “And then I’m going to write this book called The Fully Charged Life.” I was living my life to the best of my ability, and good things came of that because I always sort of approached everything with confidence, kindness, and openness.

Rachel Brenke:
What would you tell someone who’s listening that’s like, “All right, great, I’m on board. I want to be authentic. I want to put out either content, or vibes, or energy in the world,” but they don’t necessarily embrace the as full transparency as you provided. I mean, what were some tips to maybe help them navigate how much to share, how much not to share, because some people are just more personal in nature.

Meaghan Murphy:
Oh, sure, and that’s just my journey. I think the key is, is to figure out what you care about, what really, really matters to you. Because when you can make that thing, whatever that is, that just really gets you excited that you can’t wait to share with other people, maybe you have this amazing talent for making denim jackets with incredible embroidery, you have this secret talent, or you have this secret passion, and that’s what you want. That’s going to be your side hustle, that’s going to be your business.

Rachel Brenke:
Mm-hmm (affirmative) mm-hmm (affirmative) Yeah, because I know one of the things that I have always gone into my personal brand is I’m going to be as transparent as possible, but then shit happens in life, and then you’re like, “Maybe I don’t want to be this personal,” and for me, I kind of wrestled with, well, I’ve always told my audience and those I’m connecting with that I would be fully transparent, but now all of a sudden, I want to put the brakes on it, I almost felt inauthentic.

Meaghan Murphy:
Well, here’s the thing. I think that you don’t have to share with the world, but you do have to share with someone. So for me, I’m very comfortable sharing publicly, because I call it living with my cab light on, and I find the more open I am, the more cool experiences or rides, if you will, that I’m able to go on. It’s like, imagine you can’t get on a cab if the light’s not on. And ,for me, the more open I am, the more willing I am to share the more incredible connections and experiences I seem to attract. But you don’t have to put yourself out there in a super big way. I mean, you just need to say whatever it is out loud to someone.

I can remember a friend saying to me like, “I have this passion and I’m just going to go out on a limb, and I would love to do X.” Well, the second you say it out loud, you begin to own it. You begIn to believe that you can do it because you’ve put it out in the universe. So tell the grocery store clerk who can’t really tell anybody beyond that, or tell the mailman, tell somebody, obviously from six feet away, but tell somebody because saying what you want, saying what you care about out loud is such an act of bravery, that begins to put things in motion.

I think that sometimes just having the courage to want something different than you currently have is all it takes, is just taking that one step toward, “You know what? I’ve always wanted to have my own Etsy boutique,” or “You know what? I’ve always wanted to be a dance instructor,” or “I’ve always wanted to fill in the blank.” Tell somebody. I mean, I can remember working at Cosmo and flipping through an issue of Self magazine and saying, “I’m going to be the fitness director there someday.” Okay. I was the senior sex editor. That was the most outlandish statement ever, at that moment, but I said it out loud and then I realized, “Hey, you know what? This is what I want,” and I just was brave enough to say it out loud, and now what action steps can I take to actually make it happen?

Rachel Brenke:
Mm-hmm (affirmative) And actually, that’s how you ended up here, because I told my team, I said, “I want her,” at the time when you were the executive editor at Good Housekeeping and I said, “I want her for the podcast.” It was scary for me to say that to my team, because I didn’t want to have any rejections, and actually I had a whole list of people. I went sat down one day and said, “These are all the people I would love to interview and bring to my audience,” but it was scary, because I was afraid that I would get all these rejections, and then how would I look to my team, right?

Meaghan Murphy:
Yeah. And that’s the thing, I don’t think you can be successful without being vulnerable. I think we have to be okay with sometimes not being okay, and hearing the no, getting the door slammed, who cares? Right? Because if you are not vulnerable, you will never ultimately be successful.

Rachel Brenke:
I agree with that, and I think circling this back around to the personal brand aspect, is sometimes you can get so overwhelmed with, “I had nine to five, or I’m on this career trajectory, I don’t know how to fit it in there,” it’s just doing little bits of it. Because I think what happens is you get overwhelmed, so you tell yourself no, and to me, that’s the ultimate rejection. So I love the fact that you’re like, put it out there. I would even take a step further, verbally tell that grocery store clerk right now, they would love to hear something good other than people complaining about [inaudible 00:17:10], but also, taking the first step to do it. So like what you were saying, even if it’s just creating an Instagram and just put one photo at the end of your walk, whatever it is, one [inaudible 00:17:21] bits, that will start, to me, will break down that wall that you may have and allow you to be a bit more vulnerable and a bit more transparent to build this personal brand and [inaudible 00:17:31]-

Meaghan Murphy:
Exactly. I think the key is always in the doing, right? So it’s about taking an action. We’re all quarantined right now. If there is a skill you’ve always wanted to learn, this is the moment to learn the language, to get your personal trainer certification, to take an online course, to watch tutorials and videos, to build some kind of expertise, to explore what that might look like. I think those are key action steps. It’s like, “Okay, I’ve always wanted to be a makeup artist.” Well, now’s the moment to find out what that actually looks like, what that actually means, to do some research, to follow really incredible Instagram or YouTube accounts with people who have done successful makeup tutorials. Whatever that is, give yourself some tools, give yourself some resources, do some research, because right now, we have a little bit more time stuck in the house to sort of take one step toward a goal.

Rachel Brenke:
Mm-hmm (affirmative) And what I love about your story too is that you didn’t have Instagram when you were beginning to build yourself up as an expert, and influencer, and brand in these different areas. What was available then? Because I feel like a lot of people get stuck in this, and I’m one of them. I’m raising my hand, it’s like it’s got to be a picture perfect Instagram. It’s got to be perfect, funny tweets that people will retweet. Well, you didn’t have any of that to build this, so what did you use at the time?

Meaghan Murphy:
I think the interesting… I mean, I’ve always, I’ve been lucky enough to be in the media, so I did have a magazine platform. I’ve had magazine columns, I have always been on morning television, I’ve been lucky enough to be a guest on Live With Kelly for the past 15 years, or Today Show. So I’ve been lucky enough to have a forward-facing kind of job, public facing job, if you will, but I think the key too, is just building where you are, so building community. I also run the social media for my town. I live in Westfield, I call it Bestfield, And that was just something I kind of grew grassroots, like talk to every shop clerk, say hi to everybody, interact, have the Cheers effect within your town, where people know who you are and what you stand for.

Rachel Brenke:
Yeah, I love that, and I didn’t mean to make it sound like, “Before social media came around.”

Meaghan Murphy:
Well, and the thing is, I love social media because I used to think about it this way, I only get to make 12 magazines a year. Now I can talk to an audience all day long, as many times as I want, and it’s this endless stream of content, and so for me, that’s an endless points of connection, endless sources of information. So I kind of say like, “Hey, what am I going through? Wow, I need more projects for my kids, or I need workout ideas, or I need a DIY three pound weight. How can I help provide that content to someone else?” So I mean, social media is wonderful in the sense that it allows us these points of connection, and especially if you’re trying to start a business, you can reach out to people and attempt to connect with people that you never would’ve been able to do five, 10, 15 years ago.

Rachel Brenke:
Yeah. Let me ask you this. Let’s say we have someone who’s listening, this comes from a question I had in the group for the podcast, but I’m sure there’s many that’s listening, they love their nine to five, but they are afraid to start kind of this forward-facing brand now, because they don’t really see how it could tie in to help their career, or they feel like their passions, what you’re talking about, what matters is completely opposite, because yours kind of goes together. Your personality in the magazine world and all you’ve done mesh, but what if they have what matters to them and what they want to build, is completely opposite from their career?

Meaghan Murphy:
Mm-hmm (affirmative) And that’s scary too, because we need the paycheck, and it’s really easy to say like, “Quit the day job, pursue your passion,” but that’s irresponsible. Most of us can’t do that. I was doing cartwheels when I got my book deal with Penguin Random House and beyond excited, but it certainly didn’t mean I could quit my job, it meant I could hustle my heart out for a good two years to get it both done, to get all of it done, because as nice as having a book advance and a book deal is, it doesn’t pay the mortgage totally, and once you get the book, if you don’t crush the book world, you still need a paycheck.

So I think it’s irresponsible to just say, “Hey, pursue your passion, quit your job.” No, that’s not possible. But what can you do in your current situation to take steps toward achieving the bigger dream? And I think that’s when you’ll start to feel satisfaction. There’s got to be something you can do. It might not mean you’re giving up the steady paycheck and the nine to five, but by doing small things to reach the larger goal, you’ll start to feel better, and you’ll probably have more satisfaction in the nine to five anyway.

Rachel Brenke:
Yeah, because well, I’m definitely thinking, as an attorney myself, I hear from attorneys all the time who are like, “Well, I want to quit, but I can’t. I have student loans, but I have such a passion for candle making,” and I’m like, “Then set up a candle making YouTube.”

Meaghan Murphy:
Exactly.

Rachel Brenke:
You can do all of this in your quote unquote spare time, but their idea is they think, “Well, it’s not helping to further my career,” and obviously the career brings benefits, money, and advancement. So I can understand the conflict there. For me though, I’ve always been one, I kind of just want to do what I want. I mean, I’m wearing ripped jeans and a nose ring, even when I’m sharing about legal stuff on Instagram.

Meaghan Murphy:
Yeah. Well, and I think that’s really cool and refreshing, right? And it takes a lot of confidence to be able to do that. And I applaud that because I think that’s ultimately what makes you successful, is that you don’t give a rat’s, you’re doing you.

Rachel Brenke:
Mm-hmm (affirmative) Yeah, well that can bite you in the ass sometimes. But yeah, no, I get what you’re saying. But so, that’s a great piece of advice, and there may be concerns, some of you might have a career that’s really sensitive and you can’t put yourself out there publicly. I know people in certain fields that they just can’t do it. I, maybe Meaghan, you have some tips on if they can’t be the face, because we know faces connect, face and voice connects, but what if they can’t be publicly on the internet for whatever they do in their career, or other life circumstances? What are some tips so they can inject the personal brand into developing this platform, but not necessarily have their face involved?

Meaghan Murphy:
Well, and I think there’s so many successful brands that don’t necessarily have the founder as the face person. I think have a mascot, have a really compelling spokesperson. Maybe that’s your kid, or your neighbor, or your husband, it doesn’t have to be you. So many people that are entrepreneurial and creative aren’t comfortable with any kind of spotlight, regardless if it’s appropriate for their job or not. So don’t think that that has to be you. You don’t have to necessarily be the face of the brand. I think you can put forward a product, an idea, or a service without necessarily saying, “Hey, look at me,” because so many people are not comfortable with that, and that’s also okay.

Rachel Brenke:
Mm-hmm (affirmative) One of the things that I’ve done with my brands, I’m obviously okay with being personal front and center, but with each of my different businesses I have an end goal of one day, that’s my retirement plan. I plan to sell it off, so I’ve made steps to be very purposeful and starting out with me at the front, but then transitioning and kind of removing myself, and putting more of like what you just talked about front and center, so I could easily sell it off or pass it off to somebody else later on down the line, and it’s not so intimately connected to me.

Meaghan Murphy:
Yeah, so I think that’s really smart. I’m also of the mindset the time is now, tomorrow may never come. So as important as it is, you don’t want to totally push off your dreams, and I think that what you can be doing right now is also super important.

Rachel Brenke:
Love it, these are great. You have answered all the top ones that I wasn’t sure how to answer these for the audience, since I’m not working a nine to five, now instead it’s 24 hours a day, because surprise! That’s what building a brand and all that can sometimes feel like, but do you have any last tips for anyone listening to maybe wants to do what you’re doing, building this personal brand that also crosses and meshes with your career path?

Meaghan Murphy:
And I will say to you, it’s not always seamless. I’ve gotten my hand slapped for doing a partnership perhaps that the bigger company wasn’t happy with, or overextending myself with all the [inaudible 00:26:56], I also have a podcast, and numerous, numerous different projects, and the struggle to juggle is real, and I think there’s going to be moments where that you do have to ask forgiveness, because you didn’t ask permission, and you kind of have to be okay with that, but I think the real secret sauce is really chasing what matters to you and figuring out what that is that matters most.

Rachel Brenke:
Right. I agree. I love it. Well, Meaghan, thank you so much for taking your time. I know you’re extremely busy. Y’all have to check out her Instagram and everything, her videos, everything is so inspiring, and a lot of good information. I’m going to post all of her social media stuff on the show notes page, so it’s going to be rachelbrenke.com/epi118, 118, and we will also update whenever your book comes out in spring of 2021, we’ll update it there-

Meaghan Murphy:
Oh, thank you.

Rachel Brenke:
… and maybe we’ll have you back to talk a little bit about it, so I’m excited.

Meaghan Murphy:
I would love that.

Rachel Brenke:
Thank you again so much for coming on, and guys, make sure you dig into the Facebook group, Business Bites Podcast, so that we can have a discussion with other people that may be going through the exact same situation that we talked about today, and I’ll see you guys there.

Speaker 2:
Thanks for joining Rachel on this episode of the Business Bites. For show notes, a list of recommended tools, or referenced episodes, you can find them at businessbitespodcast.com. Until next time.

Featured Guest & Resources

@meaghanbmurphy @theyaylist @bestfieldnj @offthegrampodcast

Meaghan B Murphy is an author, editor, on-air personality, lifestyle and health expert and influencer, a home-hack master and certified trainer. Meaghan was recently named Content Director of Woman’s Day (the #1 selling magazine on newsstands), charged with energizing the brand in print and digital. This follows a 6-year stint as executive editor at Good Housekeeping, where Meaghan helped dust off and reimagine the 130-year-old megabrand with a soup-to-nuts redesign that took a more modern, fun and can-do approach to domesticity, boosting the magazine’s cool factor and its readership in the coveted 18-to-34 category without losing its core, older audience.

Along with planning and top-editing Woman’s Day, which reaches 18 million readers each month, Meaghan also develops strategic partnerships across all platforms, conceives of new ways to generate revenue and promotes WD in the media as a regular guest expert on “Live with Kelly & Ryan,” “Today,” “GMA”, “The Dr. Oz Show,” and many more. In addition, Meaghan shot a year-long series for NBC News titled “A Better Way,” in which she shared MacGyver-style home hacks and shortcuts, which led to a column in GH. She joined the fourth season of “Small Business Revolution” (Hulu) as an expert in building community spirit – something she effectively did as Chief Spirit Officer of her own suburban town of Westfield, New Jersey.

A media veteran, Meaghan began her magazine career at YM as an intern after her college scholarship-winning essay on overcoming adversity garnered the attention of editors. Soon after, the prolific go-getter wrote her way to a contributing editor position. She became one of the founding editors of Teen People while still finishing her dual degree in English and acting at Rutgers University, then went on to write for and edit various web sites, was an on-air lifestyle correspondent for MTV and worked on the Victoria’s Secret creative team that launched the PINK line. She dove back into magazines with a short stint at Lifetime before jumping to Cosmopolitan as a senior editor covering sex, relationships, health and wellness. Meaghan’s passion for fitness brought her to SELF in 2005, her home for nine years, first as fitness director then deputy editor. There she produced the magazine’s uber-popular Self Challenge program every year and appeared in fitness videos with stars such as Jillian Michaels, Tone It Up, Shaun T, and on Exercise TV and Daily Burn. Plus, she produced and directed celebrity yoga instructor Mandy Ingber’s first DVD, Yogalosophy with a foreword from Jennifer Aniston.

Today Meaghan is known for her high-energy, upbeat personality and lifestyle, which she shares regularly with her 16,000 Instagram followers. Through that platform, she’s personally become a sought-after figure for lifestyle and wellness conferences (She was a keynote “Mother: The Summit 2019” in Detroit last October) and projects. For example, she is profiled in the documentary “The Search for Aliveness” as its “high-energy, rock-star mom.” Additionally, she’s been featured on many radio shows and podcasts (she co-hosted “Conversations with Maria Menounos” on SiriusXM!), Fashionweekdaily.com’s “The Daily Front Row,” The Everymom.com, The Newsette, Macaroni Kid and more, and just launched her own podcast entitled Off the Gram with fellow wellness influencers.

A New Jersey native, Meaghan married her younger brother’s best friend, Pat, and together they live in Westfield with their “Irish triplets,” Charley (9), James (7) and Brooks (almost 6), and labradoodle Dempsey where Meaghan is busy penning her debut book “The Fully Charged Life” out with Penguin/Random House in Spring 2021.

You can find Meaghan here:
Website
Facebook
Instagram
Twitter

Hi, I’m Rachel Brenke

Rachel Brenke

As a mom, team USA athlete and cancer-survivor, I want a real life while I have a real business.  This is why my resources don’t promote hustle-culture, rather tough-love and no-holds-barred tips to achieving both.  In addition to this website, I have a top-ranked business podcast, been featured in places like Forbes and work 1:1 with so many of you.

Enough about me though. I am proud of you for pursuing entrepreneurship. It is rewarding and amazing.  Keep at it!

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