Business Bites Episode 116: How to Solve ANY Problem in Your Business

How to Solve ANY Problem in Your Business

Episode 116 on the Business Bites Podcast

The Gist Of This Episode: Anyone who owns a business knows that there will be a problem at some point. Listen in as Rachel and Stacy Tuschl discuss ways to manage and overcome those challenges.  This episode was recorded in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, so listen for some tips relating to that as well!

 

What you will learn:

  • why you should be the gatekeeper of your calendar
  • why you should note and remember lessons learned
  • why you should stay open-minded to solutions
  • what to do when you feel overwhelmed and stuck
  • and more!

Expand To Read Episode Transcripts

Rachel Brenke:
Hey, guys, welcome to episode 116 of the Business Bites Podcast. I am your host, Rachel Brenke and today I am joined by another podcaster. I absolutely love “meeting” others online that do similar to what I do. So Stacy, welcome.

Stacy:
Hi, Rachel. Thanks for having me.

Rachel Brenke:
Of course. So our topic today is how to solve any problem in your business. And we were talking before the show. For you guys listening, we’re recording this during the middle of the COVID pandemic. We are just going to see where the conversation takes us because there’s a lot of problems and challenges right now for entrepreneurs, but anything we talk about, you guys will be able to use for the future, also. Good lessons to learn out of it. As a reminder, the show notes are going to be at rachelbrenke.com/epi116.

All right, Stacy, they’ve already heard your bio, but I want to hear from you, in your words, how did you get into entrepreneurship and where you are now?

Stacy:
Yeah. I actually started right out of high school. The summer I graduated I decided I didn’t want to stop dancing. I was on the dance team, I was really enjoying it. But I knew I wasn’t going to be a professional dancer. I thought, well, just for fun, I will start a middle-school competitive dance team, here locally in Milwaukee. And I had 17 kids jump in that first summer. Within three years we had 100 dancers coming to my parent’s backyard. That’s where we were holding our practices. And then, as I was about to graduate from college, I realized, okay, I might have a business here. This might be something I could really do and continue to do my passion as my career, which was really exciting.

In 2005 I incorporated, I opened up my first dance studio. And today, in 2020, we have two locations in Milwaukee. We serve about 1000 dance and music students every week. Right now we are shut down so we’re experiencing some new challenges we’ve never had before. But we have about 40 to 50 employees every year. And we’ve been grossing over $1 million a year, several years.

That naturally led to people saying to me, “How are you doing this? Can I pick your brain?” And it led into more coaching. And then about five years ago I actually launched an online consulting business and now today that is what Foot Traffic is.

Rachel Brenke:
I love it. But I want to know, if you had to go back in time to when you first started all this, making this big jump into entrepreneurship, what is something that you would change?

Stacy:
Well, first I want to start by saying the one thing that I had on my side was being a little naive. I was so young doing this and that is one thing I needed to keep because if you knew what you were getting into, you probably wouldn’t be jumping as fast. I would say the one thing I would change is just really remembering, I don’t know everything yet. I really need to listen to others and find a mentor as fast as possible and just find people that can help me who’ve already been there versus thinking I should know this, or I should be figuring this out on my own. Absolutely not. You don’t have to be doing that. Especially today, with podcasts and so many incredible free resources.

Rachel Brenke:
And I’ve talked about that on the podcast before because I was very similar in the beginning and that’s why I chuckled when you said about being naive, because I told myself, well, I’m going to do it and I don’t need to look to anyone else. Of course, the time was a bit different. It was Myspace days. It was before all the freemium information was available out there. But I often stop and think how much further along would I be had I looked to a mentor or consumed the information that was available. So yeah, that’s a great piece of information. And since we’re sitting in COVID quarantine right now, the uptick in information, I’m overwhelmed with how much is out there. Actually, in that vein of consuming information and looking to others, do you have a piece of advice for those that are sitting there right now going, there’s all of this noise on the internet while I’m at home but I want to work on my business? How do they even sift through all that?

Stacy:
Yeah, you definitely want to make sure that you are not just consuming right now, that you really are producing. You’ve got to be the gatekeeper to your calendar, even if it feels like you have unlimited amount of time. I don’t know about you Rachel, but I have kids, and I feel like I have less time now that they’re home. I realize how much I need by my nine to three when they’re at school.

But I would say, really start to ask yourself, is this relevant now? I know Rachel, you mentioned you have so much relevant content on your podcast right now, specifically dealing with what we’re experiencing in the world, and we need to be. If we want to stay relevant, we have to be doing that. I would say find the mentors that are staying up to date, they’re giving you real information that you can use now, and not just six months from now. That’s a big one, just you’ve got to be selective.

And then don’t get stuck consuming. We’re not binging Netflix here. We are still moving forward. Now is not the time to pause on your business.

Rachel Brenke:
And just to piggyback on that, there is a lot going on. There’s a lot of emotional stress. So even though we’re sitting here encouraging you guys to consume, produce, and do all that, if you need to take a day, take a day, we’ve got a few days ahead of us still. If you just need to sit back and take some time, because that’s going to make you more productive when you do sit down to do all of that.

Stacy:
I definitely threw myself a pity party. Trust me. I had my party. I shed a few tears. It was really scary, especially as somebody who owns a physical location that has been shut down and we don’t know when the doors are going to open again. Our expenses exceed $100,000 a month, and I’m sitting here thinking six months now and I will be in half a million dollars in debt if I don’t start to proactively work on my business.

Trust me, when I say I threw myself a pity party, I had to go through worst case scenario, what does this look like? And then I realized, now it’s time to move forward and take action. So I do agree with you, sit in that for a little bit, look at that worst case scenario, and know that if you’ve built it once, we can build it again. We can constantly keep moving forward and use the experience from the past.

Rachel Brenke:
Which is great, because our topic that we actually booked this even before all the COVID stuff was to, how to solve any problem in your business. I want to hear from you, whether you want to apply it to the specific COVID situation, or any other type of example you have. What does that process look like when you have a problem come up in your business?

Stacy:
Yeah, this could not be more relevant now, but this is something that you can use as a skillset from now until the end of time in your business. First, when you are trying to solve a problem, I first want to ask you to stop and assess what is the problem? What are you trying to solve here? And I do a couple things. First I like to ask myself, was there anything I could have done to prevent this from happening? Because it’s not just about solving it right now, it’s about making sure this doesn’t happen again. And that’s a big one that people, I think they want to jump too soon and they just want to solve it and not really look at but where was the problem really originating from?

So even as we’re going through COVID-19, I’ve already shared, this morning, I shared some lessons learned and somebody said, “But this doesn’t apply to me. I don’t need this now. I’ll need it next time.” I’m like, “Right, but you have to stay in lessons learned. You’ve got to capture all of these things that we never knew we needed to know until today.” We need to retain that information so that next time something happens, we’ve got it in our back pocket. Be careful you’re not jumping too quickly to solve it without recognizing, could I have done anything to solve it?

Rachel Brenke:
I definitely push proactivity versus reactivity on the podcast and when I was sitting down trying to formulate and change the schedule to fit this time to help people, I was taking the top questions I was getting and I could almost sit with every question I wrote out and go, “Well, had a podcast for that, had a podcast for that.” And I, myself, was starting to get discouraged because then I was thinking, “I’ve shared with you guys how to save, how to get this type of insurance.” And for me that was the problem.

I was like, how can I solve the problem of, I’ve put the content out but I want to be able to help people also be proactive for the future. And so it was almost like I took their problem and then I was like, but my problem is there’s not consumption. And it was this whole big thing and that’s why we are where we are now. We’re just pushing forward, getting into people’s hands because I’m seeing, I’m hearing tears, I’m getting awful messages of people, like you were saying, about expenses, may have to let people go, and they almost feel like it’s too late. Or the alternative of, well I didn’t cause COVID. What was the question you asked? Is this something I caused or could I have prevented this?

Well, COVID is not the problem. The problems are, do we have too many expenses? If we’re talking budget stuff, do we have too many expenses? Do we not have enough savings? Not the right insurance. We can’t fully ever protect or prevent any problem.

Stacy:
Well and right, let’s use COVID as an example. This wasn’t your fault, you didn’t do this. You couldn’t have foreseen this to happen. But at the same time, people are always telling us to prepare, to recession proof, to have that savings, to have that safety net. There are definitely things that I could have done better and I will do better next time, knowing what I know now.

Rachel Brenke:
Same.

Stacy:
Knowing how I feel right now about my expenses and how long I really think I have before funds run out. Whether the stimulus comes out and all things like that, I still want to know that I am doing my part. I can’t wish and hope that next time the government jumps in again like they just did. You’ve really got to prepare. I think it was a rude awakening for many of us to say, man, I’m not where I wanted to be, and that you can absolutely own.

Rachel Brenke:
I did feel a little encouraged by it though because I feel like it’s going to inspire good, positive change to set people up for the future. And I’m not downplaying any struggles, stress, grief, trauma, or feeling that anyone’s feeling. I just really am looking forward to seeing the new innovation and preparation that people will take to be proactive in the future.

Stacy:
Definitely. I’ve already seen so much good come out of this. As traumatic as this has been and as sad as this has been, I do think we will see a silver lining as things start to progress as well.

As we’re looking at, well, is this my fault? Could I have prevented it? Another thing that I see that pops up is we blame not, this was an event, but sometimes we blame other people. So if we have a team, a contractor we’re working with, we’re going, but this was her problem, this was her fault. She should have done this, right? The should’ves. And I always stop and say, but again, take ownership. Is there something I could’ve done to make sure she fulfilled her position or what she said she was going to do? A lot of times there’s a lack in a system or a followup or a follow through. Okay. So that’s, that’s a big one. I’m still kind of attacking it from the sake of, I want to help you have less problems in the future.

Even though you’re saying, “But Stacy, you’re not helping me solve this problem.” No, but I’m helping you have a lot less problems later by really taking this and analyzing it. Okay? Now, when you’re heading through this, the next question is, is there a system in place and what should the system be? Because this is where you are going to start to solve the problem. And I actually want you to write it down because I want you to be consistent. If this happens again, somebody demands a refund or somebody complains about your product. I don’t want you to give plan A today and then 60 days from now it happens again and you whip up a new plan A, right? I want you to go back and use your resources to then provide that solution. So the question is, what is the system?

What would you like to do with this and how would you like to handle this? It’s your business. You get to decide what that looks like. Does that make sense?

Rachel Brenke:
Yeah. And let’s take the example of maybe savings or maybe you can come up with a different one. But I’m thinking a system so that I don’t even have to think about it. I already want maybe to set up my bank account to automatically send my check to my step IRA. And that’s what I have to do because when I was hand having to do it, I was forgetting about it.

Stacy:
Yeah. Well, and I love that you brought up a bank because one of the things I always say is a new system is manual. It takes your brain extra effort to really get this system in place, but pretty soon it starts to become automated.

A bank account, you can click a button and it really is automated, but even systems where we don’t get software and internet and all of this involved, you will still start to create new habits that will start to become very automated in your business. But in the beginning it will feel manual, which is why you’ll need some sort of trigger to make sure it happens. Let’s say banking, let’s stay to this one and you want to start to save money. Maybe you don’t want to set up automatic withdrawal because you’re not sure if you’re going to have the extra thousand dollars a month. In the beginning you’re manually checking what does this look like? What are the leftover fines? Okay, I’m going to manually transfer this from my checkings to my savings. You’ll do that a few months until all of a sudden you’re going to go, wow, I’m really getting good at this and I always had that thousand.

Now you’ll automate it, right? That’s what we’re trying to do with the problems we have in our business. I think another thing too is to understand, problems will happen. You’ve never experienced COVID-19. You have no idea how to handle it. And what’s crazy to me and it’s not even crazy, I expect this now, but it’s crazy how some of our clients are judging the way that we’re handling this and they’re so disappointed in us for doing something like this. So they can’t believe we’re not just being open for free. And doing all of the things we can do to help the community. And it’s funny because how could anybody expect us to know what to do in a situation we’ve never been in?

Rachel Brenke:
[crosstalk 00:14:22] Government directives are different day to day.

Stacy:
Yeah, yeah. I mean we’re sending out emails and then all of a sudden we hit send. And all of a sudden something new happens on the news and we look stupid for sending out that email because it doesn’t look like we’re watching, but it’s just happening so quickly.

Rachel Brenke:
Yeah. And I wonder, I mean, I think there’s an element of not allowing the fear of feeling like you’re going to do the wrong thing. You’ve heard the phrases failing forward and all that sort of stuff. In your situation, I would encourage, send that email that’s better than doing nothing at all. I, as a consumer would feel better, even if it wasn’t a full all encompassing email, because I understand you’re human. Definitely, if you’re feeling gun shy about any sort of action you’re trying to take, whether it’s for COVID or in the future, the steps that you just outlined, Stacy, are very great ways to approach it. Be confident in the choices that you’re making and follow through and see how that’s working. And where does that fall in your steps here of solving a problem?

Stacy:
Yeah, so it was just going to say to you, one of the things I always say to myself is there’s always a solution. I have a couple of phrases that get me through hard times. One of them recently has been, we’ll figure it out, we always do. I say to my staff over and over and over when something’s like, but what about this? I always say, we’ll figure it out, we always do. And then they’ll go, you’re right. We do. It kind of helps keep that morale up. So another craze is there’s always a solution. It might not be the thing you are thinking is your solution. You’ve got to stay open minded, now more than ever. I keep telling people, you may have to shift your product, you might have to sell something you’ve never sold before.

But if you’re a chiropractor and you just keep thinking, but I have to meet them in person and you are so stuck on knowing the solution. This is where you have to be open minded because your solution right now, you cannot legally continue to do what you’ve been doing. You must pivot and do something different and that’s why I need you to be open minded to the possibility of what else is out there.

Rachel Brenke:
It’s funny you say that because I’ve actually been collecting screenshots of different ads and emails by watching companies pivot in there changing. Domino’s is one of the first one that started advertising the contactless delivery. Edible Arrangements, now I can call and just have produce delivered. I don’t necessarily have to get the whole fruit bouquet. It’s been really fun and that’s what I was kind of referencing earlier too. It’s been fun.

This sounds so weird guys. I’m really not that horrible a person, but I’ve got to buy a little joy in things and I find joy in watching how companies respond to situations, how they treat their customers and so it has been a good exercise, I guess, is the better word, to watch companies pivot like on the Friends episode. Pivot, pivot. And change their marketing up and to change how they’re doing things, like the chiropractor thing. I did something to my neck two weeks ago, I would love to be able to have a phone call with my chiropractor and be like, “What can I do for my neck from home?” I’d paid for that right now, but they’re closed. They’re not offering anything.

Stacy:
Yeah. We just had one of our clients who is a chiropractor and she is now doing virtual consults on Zoom. She’s going to teach you some exercises. That is how you get resourceful. That is how you get strappy and you make it through any problem that you have. It’s not about your resources, it’s how resourceful are you? And what are you willing to do? And I agree with you. I think it’s been really intriguing or interesting to watch people pivot. And it’s inspiring. It’s making me want to continue to double down and serve where I can. I love watching how people are reacting because it’s truly showing the character. And I keep telling anybody that is not happy with something we’ve done, I just keep ending each email with, “We’re doing the best we can.” And I believe that. And when I believe it, I think it shows too. We have a thousand students and we’ve only had 40, 20 in dance and 20 in music drop right now.

Which to me that is crazy low. I am so proud of the retention we’d had. And it’s because I truly believe we are doing the best that we can do.

Rachel Brenke:
And I wouldn’t even attribute those 40 at anything that you have or haven’t done. It’s just the economic state of everything right now.

Stacy:
Completely. And people leaving graciously saying, “I’m so sorry, we just cannot continue to do this.” But we’re, again, being resourceful, looking at what can we do next and what’s our next step and we’re constantly looking ahead. And that is all you can do when problem solving. And be ready for it and to know that it’s going to happen. It’s a part of business. You are never going to not have problems in your business. That is crazy to think that. Be okay with knowing things will happen that you’ve never experienced before and you won’t know how to solve it until you’re starting to figure it out in the moment.

Rachel Brenke:
Let me ask you this. What happens when you get in that moment and it just seems so overwhelming of a problem that even going through this checklist you’ve given them, isn’t helping them to reevaluate or pivot or any of that, what can they do if they just feel stuck?

Stacy:
I would love to get somebody else involved here. I would love for you to get a peer, a friend, a mastermind, partner, anything like that to ask their opinion. Sometimes we’re so close to our own problems, we can’t see the solution and sometimes, let’s say it’s a problem with a customer, ask them what is something-

Let’s say somebody messaged you and said, “I was expecting more from this product, program or service, unfortunately.” You can respond and say, well what were you hoping to get out of it and what’s something you would love to see in here? You might get an idea that you’ve never thought of before and it becomes something that everybody loves about your offering.

Rachel Brenke:
Or the customer is just happy to be heard too.

Stacy:
Absolutely. Always say, “Thank you so much for letting me share my opinion.” They just feel so hurt, especially when you take them seriously and you really read it. And all of a sudden maybe one of those things is something that’s a part of your business. They are so grateful.

And that’s one of our ways that we help to solve problems because since I mean, with you, my hands are not on everything. I don’t hear everything that goes on and if we don’t have some sort of process in place, I’ll never know the problems or the bottlenecks. And so we keep running lists of top questions or pain points from our customers, our clients, depending on which of my business is in. And then I sit down and I evaluate them on a routine basis to say, is this something we can automate? What are we doing differently here? And actually, the situation you just outlined, if you have a customer who’s upset about something they purchased and meet expectations, turning around and asking, not in like a negative way but, welcoming, please tell me. And that has been something that’s been really pivotal in changing our customer service. And it really has given me the answers and taken a load off of a lot of those quote unquote problems that were on our list.

Stacy:
Yeah. And you just reminded me too that this isn’t something that if you have a team, you don’t want to be getting all of the problems. You don’t want to be having to deal with all of the negative emails or all of the negative phone calls.

We have systems in place where we actually have something called, a hundred dollar happiness policy where-

Rachel Brenke:
We do too.

Stacy:
Oh, do you? Okay, I love this and it’s so nice because it kind of fuels and makes my team feel confident that they can take action and fix something. But then all they have to do is report on certain things. If we say, if you’re getting X amount of emails, we want to know. Set some limits and some parameters so they’re aware and you’re not going, “Whoa, how did I not know we’re getting a negative email every day?” because I think it’s draining if you’re seeing every single negative thing that people are saying about you and your business. And with us, we have thousands of clients. So of course not every single person is loving us. I mean, we’re going to have different opinions.

Rachel Brenke:
And just to be clear on that, I kind of cut you off because I got excited because that was the example I was going to use, I empower my team much like the way you were getting at, that if they need to solve a problem or something, they can unilaterally decide to refund up to $100 or a gift, a product or something of up to a hundred dollars without having to ask me.

Stacy:
Yes. And thank you for saying that. And then we have a thing where let’s say $100 just does not cut it or it’s not going to be good enough. Then the system is, it escalates to the manager who has a higher amount or is allowed to do something different. We have systems in place to decide when it comes to me, and I always say to the person who is working under me, my general manager, I’m like, “You can give whatever you need to give away because by the time it comes to me, I mean, they’ve been passed around way too many times.” I’m like, this is not going to go well. We just want to end on good terms and have a good relationship.

Rachel Brenke:
And I think sometimes entrepreneurs will push back when I make this recommendation of this policy or plan with your team. But the idea is, for me to have to come in and stop what I’m doing as CEO and resolve this. Not that I don’t want to, but if it can be resolved though a customer service team, I’m going to end up spending more of my time where I could be earning more elsewhere than that hundred dollars.

Stacy:
Absolutely. And Rachel, I agree with you 100% and I also think your customer doesn’t want to have to wait to talk to management. They don’t want to wait three more days until you get back to them. When you equip your people to be able to help immediately, I think it shows great customer service.

Rachel Brenke:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). And one thing, to kind of loop around on what you were saying earlier with the management example. You want to give enough tools to people to solve problems within your company, entity, whatever it is that you want to call it on your team. But I also, and this is kind of my transparency here, I have had a downfall of almost allowing for, I take a step back, give benefit of the doubt, but almost to a fault even after re-evaluating, making sure I’m providing the right management. And the problem’s just not getting solved. And it’s, I’ll just keep letting it happen, letting it happen, thinking, oh, they’re going to fix it, they’re going to figure it out no matter what I change. But sometimes a solution or problem, maybe removal of a team member, it may be removal of a program, quitting a business. That may be that solution.

Stacy:
A removal of a client. That’s possible.

Rachel Brenke:
Yeah, yeah. And so I share that to say though I feel like I’m visually thinking of the spectrum of solutions, down from coming up with a quick process all the way through. It maybe something that’s huge. Life-changing.

Stacy:
But it’s only going to help. Making that hard decision now will help so many other problems down the road.

Rachel Brenke:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah, and like my example, if the team members just not getting it, no matter how much I tried to change my management style or ways I’ve drug my feet too long before, and it started poisoning the well with my existing other team members. And finally, that’s what made me say, all right, we have to solve this problem. But it wasn’t just getting rid of a team member then it was, okay, now it’s time to hire.

We started over the whole new set of problems as we looked at our hiring and qualification process, which can be really overwhelming. But I think in those moments, take them as good times too. One problem may highlight a bunch of other problems. You don’t have to tackle them all at once, but it gives you a good view of your business.

Stacy:
And it’s just about refining. You don’t have to start over from scratch and make these massive pivots and just refine, get a little better. That compound effect, you will feel it. Trust me.

Rachel Brenke:
Have we gotten through all your major steps of how to solve any problem?

Stacy:
Yeah, I think the last one is really one of those things that, it doesn’t really matter if you’re consulting other people in the beginning or the end, but it’s a crucial step and a lot of you’re in your own way. You don’t see your blind spots. That’s why it’s good to get somebody else’s opinion.

Rachel Brenke:
My encouragement would be to someone that’s actually going to give you tough love. Your mom’s probably not the best person to ask because she’s going to think everything you do is amazing anyways.

Stacy:
Or a client that is loving you no matter what you do, she’s always going to say everything that you’re doing is great. Agreed. Get somebody that’s going to give you honest feedback.

Rachel Brenke:
Awesome. Well Stacy, I much appreciate you coming on today guys. Stacy has so much information. Her podcast is phenomenal. I’m going to link all of it rachelbrenke.com/epi116. Do you want to leave us with one last bit of information, encouragement, a tip? Anything you can think of during this COVID time?

Stacy:
Yeah, I would say, well first, thank you for having me. This has been fun. I loved having this conversation. I would say as we’re heading in these unknown territory, this uncharted waters, just give yourself some grace and remember that you don’t know all the answers. You don’t have them, but you do have a community of people that we’re all striving for the same thing. We are all trying to get through this together. And I would say just mean in surround yourself by podcasts like this and people that are doing the same thing that are more positive than listening, getting sucked into the news all day long and feeling negative. That’s my biggest thing is just stay around the right people. You’re average five, that we say like you’re the average of the five people. Those five people are more important now than ever, and do not let one of those be the news please.

Rachel Brenke:
Yeah, I found myself doing that, scrolling through the news. Finally, I was like, I’ve got to remove this app from my phone. Well awesome Stacy, thank you so much, much appreciate it. I definitely want to have you come back because you’re a wealth of knowledge. And y’all listening. Don’t forget to jump into the Business Bites Facebook group. We have threads specific to every episode. Freebies go in there as well. And don’t forget that we also have the COVID resource page. Rachelbrenke.com/COVID. We’re putting all of the podcasts specific to this time on there. Free resources. I just updated a whole bunch of stuff before recording this episode so you guys can find a wealth of knowledge. As always, reach out if you need anything and have a good week.

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Featured Guest & Resources

Stacy Tuschl has made a name for herself as an expert in growing small businesses. Put it this way, Stacy started her own business at the age of 18 in her parents’ backyard and turned that company into a multi-million dollar business she still runs today (The Academy of Performing Arts has two locations in her home state of Wisconsin). In addition to being a Small Business Growth Coach, Stacy is a bestselling author, and founder of the Foot Traffic Formula – helping small businesses around the world get more customers in the door, more profit in their pocket and more happiness in their homes.

When local area businesses started asking Stacy how she grew her company so rapidly, it sparked the inspiration needed to launch The Foot Traffic Podcast. Her podcast now has over 1 million downloads and is frequently on the top 30 of all marketing on iTunes.

Stacy was recently named the 2019 Wisconsin Small Business Person of the Year by the United States Small Business Administration. She was featured in Inc. Magazine as one of the top 10 podcasts for moms looking to grow a thriving business and has also been featured in the Huffington Post and popular podcasts like Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield, Eventual Millionaire, and Social Media Marketing.

You can find Stacy here:
Website
Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
Pinterest

About the author

Rachel Brenke is a lawyer, author and business consultant. She is currently helping professionals all over the world initiate, strategize and implement strategic business and marketing plans through various mediums of consulting resources and legal direction.

Hi, I’m Rachel Brenke

Rachel Brenke

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